Postal Hoof Protection

Submitted by Mari Ural, Team Easyboot 2016 Member

"Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night" will stay this boot...they deliver!  Easyboot Glue-Ons kept old and new riders heading down the trail at the Virgin Outlaw five day ride.  We had rain, which turned to snow and a blizzard.  It was complete with plenty of mud in the first days and beautiful sunshine on the last days the horses took to the trail.


Quest passed his 7,000 mile mark (thank you again EasyCare!) and introduced Dana Landale's new girl Tika to her first 50.  She liked it so much she did two more 50's during the week!  Another newby was 15 year old McKell Rex, the granddaughter of J.B. Rex, endurance rider, farrier and EasyCare representative.  She had a great time on her first 50 atop her grandpa's 18 year old Arabian, Red.

Tika's first 50 and she had a snow storm, mud and wrangling cattle down the trail.  McKell's first 50 and she got to go up Thunder Mountain, which started by crossing an itsy bitsy ridge line.  A fine rider and horse, no flinches were witnessed. McKell and new horse Tika had already traveled through the wilderness of Hancock and Casto Canyon in the morning hours, so this rocky ledge trail was a piece of cake for them in their Glue-Ons.

A wonderful time was had by all and the boots never failed. Thanks to super photographer Steve Bradley and his death defying adventures to find great photo shots.

National Championship 100

Submitted by Leah Cain, Team Easyboot 2016 Member

The National Championship 100 miler was a good day for me and my gelding OT Dyamonte Santo. He had been well prepared with plenty of conditioning and good, consistent hoof care.  We applied my favorite boot for 100's and multi days, the Easyboot Glue-On. We applied the Glue-Ons after the normal prep with Adhere on the hoof wall and Sikaflex on the sole. The ride had some great footing but also some really rocky, I mean sharp rocks upon sharp rock sections that I knew we would do at least a few times. I felt it very important to have plenty of concussion support and protection from those nasty rocks. I find that protection in the Glue-On.

The ride started out very fast. We knew the course so I let him pick his path and I made sure he didn't go too fast. I rode all day with Pam Bailie and junior Anya Levermann. What great riders and great company!  Monte pulsed down immediately every time we came in to the vet check and vetted out with A's so I knew he was doing well. He kept up the pace all day! 

We left three minutes before the next riders at the last vet check. Monte knew he was headed home and took off at a full on gallop!  I was so thrilled I was crying as I let out a "YeeeHaa!!!!" and got out of sight.  When we finished first feeling great, I knew we had a REALLY GOOD DAY! 

The next morning Monte looked like he hadn't done a thing and his legs where cold and tight. Great sign and a tribute to the awesome Easyboot Glue-Ons. Monte trotted out great, looking loose and fluid in his stride.  We received the Best Condition and won 1st in the National Championship!

Many, many thanks to EasyCare for all your support. What a wonderful EasyCare family that I belong to. I wouldn't be where I am today with out the best hoof boots available out there! You ROCK EasyCare!

Fall Ride on Miss Oprah

I ride my Friesian Sporthorse, Miss Oprah, in the Easyboot Trails. I love the ease of putting them on and taking them off! We ride in Montana in late spring and into fall. In the winter we ride in Arizona. The boots work great in all terrain. Miss Oprah moves out great in them and I don't have to worry about her hooves getting chipped or her soles bruising. Thanks EasyCare for making such a great product for our equine friends.

Name: Annie 
State: Arizona
Country: United States
Equine Discipline: Trail
Favorite Boot: Easyboot Trail

The Spanish Peaks Endurance Endeavour

What a privilege it has been for me being able to join Tennessee Lane, ride manager and dear friend, together with other well known riders for the inaugural Spanish Peaks 100 mile endurance ride last week. The location was very close to La Veta, Colorado; in fact, just a few miles outside of this marvel of a small town in southern Colorado.  After the National Championship Ride in Utah three weeks ago, (I wrote a Blog about it last month) this ride was another highlight of the season.

The base camp is situated at over 8000 ft with the magnificent Spanish Peaks as a background. I am using the present tense, because this base camp has been permanently installed with buildings, water wells and electricity by the Lane family and will serve as base camp for all future rides there. All pertinent info for present and future events there can be found on the SoCo Facebook page.

The Ride Manager and Team Easyboot Member Tennessee Lane at Base Camp

As to be expected, the management and organization were first class, trails perfectly marked. Exquisite catered dinners for riders and crew were the reward for everybody's efforts and labor. 

An LD, a 50 miler and a 100 miler were offered. Trails were tough, no doubt. Many vertical feet had to be climbed and descended to reach the finish line.  Lots of rocks on the trails forced riders to really go slow and take good care of their horses. Many got off and walked the really steep and rocky sections. Truly an endurance adventure, somewhat opposite to the just recent WEC in Slovakia.

Slow going during the third leg of the course. 

The scenery is truly unique, even for the spoiled Colorado crowd. 

Where do you get to see a sight like this? An old lava formation that has pushed up through some cracks in the ground millions of years ago to build this great wall we can see today.

A Mini arch or hole within that lava wall.

The geology is just fascinating:

"The Great Dikes were formed during the same period of volcanic activity as the Spanish Peaks, Mt. Mestas and Silver Mountain.
At the time these vertical granite formations were formed by molten rock, they were located several thousand feet underground, below and among many layers of sedimentary rock. Over time, as the ground rose and the softer rock was eroded away, these igneous intrusions were exposed.There are essentially three different sets of dikes in the area. One set emanates radially from the West Spanish Peak. The second set emanates radially from Silver Mountain. The third set crosses the landscape in a roughly N80E direction. The dikes in this third set are roughly parallel to one another and are the longest and oldest of the dikes. This third set of dikes was formed about the same time as the Sangre de Cristo Uplift, the event that pushed up the Sangre de Cristo Mountains." (Excerpt from the Geology Formation Site).

Completion rates were average for the distances, 90% for the LD, 80% for the 50 and 55% for the 100 miler. Personally I elected to withdraw after 60 miles from the 100 miler because of a slight inconsistency in my mare's gait, but this decision did not take anything away from the fact that this ride is a 'must do' in my book. What really made it so special is the fact that the first place award for the 100 miler was the Wahatoya Cup, donated by Nelson and Neecee Lane, and the Best Condition Award was the Kevin Myers Memorial Cup, named after our dear friend Kevin Myers, who left us all way too early. We miss you, Kevin and will always remember you now with this Trophy named after you.

The BC winner this year and in the future years will have their names engraved into the cup. Kerry Redente, riding Bluff, received these honors.

First Place Winner again here with the Wahatoya Cup:

In the end, only 5 riders finished the 100. Four out of the 5 were equipped with Easyboot Glue-On hoof boots.  With the abrasive terrain and footing, these boots were the hoof protection of choice. These results were another testimony in favor of the Easyboot Glue-Ons. Kevin would have been proud.

Tina Gottwald from Germany and visiting Global Endurance Training Center in Moab, receiving her Completion Buckle from Tennessee. She was riding TC Mounshine, a veteran 100 Mile horse from the GETC stable. TC Mounshine was also equipped with EasyCare Glue-On boots, just like the overall winner and BC Award winner.

A group photo with all the finishers of the 100 mile ride.

A memorable endurance event came to a happy ending. We are looking forward to next year, where Tennessee Lane will again be organizing three endurance races, one in each month of June, July and August. I, for sure, will attend all three again. Hope many of you will as well.


From the desk of the Bootmeister

Christoph Schork

Global Endurance Training Center.





Modifying EasyShoes for Leverage Management

How to use glue and composite shoes 101:

  1. Study the materials and hoof preparation steps  
  2. Gather the necessary materials and tools
  3. Select the best shoe size for the foot in front of you
  4. Apply the shoe and glue with attention to detail.  

These steps will lead you to success!  The shoe will stay on, and your horse will have excellent foot protection. 

I often ask myself:  Did I do everything I can to help the horse?  Some horses may need more than a basic application.‚Äč One of the biggest components of glue and composite shoes, like the EasyShoe, is the height they provide to the foot and shoeing package. That height needs to be considered when applying the shoe, it can be used to benefit the horse in a myriad of ways in performance and therapeutic applications.  

You may remember a quote from Dr. Hilary Clayton at the PHCP Conference I blogged about before:

"If the Reaction Force vector does not pass through the center of rotation of the joint it creates a torque around the joint that the soft tissue has to oppose". Dr Hillary Clayton, PHCP Conference 2016

In a large portion of the horses I work on, small details of shoe placement and leverage can greatly impact their short and long term level of soundness. This especially helps horses diagnosed with navicular and arthritis.  If the break over is a bit too far forward, or leverage is extended medial to lateral, the horse may not be comfortable, let alone sound.  This horse is a good example of how leverage reduction, determined by using the Krosscheck Leverage Testing Kit, can greatly help the farrier determine how to help the horse best: Broken Down May Not Be So Broken.  This horse is still sound and being ridden, jumped and evented now, three years after that blog was written.


Here is an example of how a shoe can be easily modified to help prevent the break over from being too far forward.  Remember because the foot is a cone, when you add height to the foot, the footprint moves forward as well.  This horse has a very forward footprint, and the shoe can be applied to either continue the forward footprint, or help the footprint move back under the center of mass of the limb, assisting with leverage reduction:

By rolling the toe of the shoe back, and extending the heel support with dental impression material we moved this horse's footprint back significantly.  
Because the shoe is composite material, the modifications can be easily done with a rasp or grinder.

I'll routinely bring the break over back in the toe, and soften the heel landing depending on the horse I'm working on.  It's also easy to add medial/lateral leverage reduction in the quarters. The pink dotted line here shows the change in where the shoe is contacting the ground. Even these small modifications can make a big difference in the comfort level and soundness of the horse. 


This is an example of a foundered horse from this blog here, who benefited from leverage reduction all around the entire shoe, creating a "ball bearing" effect.  This helped minimize the torque on her very damaged laminae:

And don't forget sometimes you want to prevent the break over from wearing too far back. 

I hope this gives you some additional ideas on how the EasyShoe can be modified to help the horse you're working on. Wedges and lifts can also be added to the bottom of the shoe, as well. In reality, you are only limited by your own imagination when it comes to modifying EasyShoes to help the horse.

For more information about this kind of work see our website:


Do You Want to Work in the Horse Industry? EasyCare Is Seeking Director Of Operations

Are you passionate about horses and hoof care?  Do you want to combine your passion for horses with your profession?  EasyCare is looking for a Director of Operations candidate to help manage daily operations.

We are looking for a team member with great people skills and broad overall business knowledge.  The position will require many hats to be worn and someone that thrives on variety.  

About the Position

  • Excellent opportunity to join an international equestrian company.  
  • Oversee day-to-day operations of fast paced equestrian company with responsibility for quality, customer satisfaction and profitability.
  • Excellent compensation and growth opportunity.

Reporting to the Owner/CEO, this position will oversee the day-to-day operations of the company including: delivery of projects, product development, inventory levels, internal processes, and customer satisfaction.  

Great opportunity for someone looking to make a big impact in a small, growing company!

Durango,Colorado.  An incredible quality of life.




  • Management.  Team member management and recruitment.
  • Financial.  Budget planning and financial reporting.  
  • Business systems.  Management of phone, accounting and web based ordering system.  
  • Inventory management.  Help forecast inventory and purchase orders.
  • Marketing vision. 


  • A great attitude and the ability to work well with others is a must.  
  • Experience hiring, mentoring, and managing team members.
  • Strong empathy for customers and passion for revenue and growth.
  • Excellent problem resolution, judgment, team building, and decision making skills.
  • Passion for and curiosity of horses.  

Durango, Colorado is a small community that offers an incredible quality of life.  Please e-mail resume and letter of interest to  Please, no phone calls.  


Garrett Ford


President & CEO

I have been President and CEO of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof boot for the barefoot horse.

Understanding Bio-Mechanics

Submitted by David Landreville, Guest HCP

 A broad, well defined, true frog tip is an indication of a properly suspended coffin bone.  When the live sole is thick it forms a bowl, referred to as concavity.  When the bowl is symmetrically shaped and deep, (at least a 1/2 inch measuring from the bottom of the collateral grooves at the tip of the frog to the peripheral edge of the sole in the quarters) the coffin bone is not only suspended off the ground by a thick flexible dome (the sole) but due to the highly vascular venous plexus at the corium, and valve like nature of the hoof capsule, P3 is also floating on a cushion of blood.  In well developed feet, added support from the digital cushion and lateral cartilages that form the internal arch make the hoof capsule a super structure that's not only capable of withstanding years of almost constant concussive forces but having the ability to convert these forces into beneficial vibrations that result in stored energy like a power pack.  The back 2/3 of the foot has the ability to develop like a muscle when the weight bearing is correctly placed over the soft tissues.  Add boots or rubber shoes to this equation and you begin to wonder...what's the limit of strength and endurance?  
This isn't a new revelation.  We read and hear about the bio-mechanics of bare feet all the time in books, videos, and on the internet but we rarely see photos of really healthy, high functioning feet. 
This video has three parts:

  • In part 1...I talk about the importance of the back of the foot being properly shaped for efficient movement.
  • In part 2...I talk about the importance of knowing the relationships of the major structural  landmarks of the sole in order to assess and mitigate structural migration. 
  • In part 3...I show some techniques to safely and effectively use a sharp hoof knife because I feel that application is more important than theory. 

October 2016 Read To Win Contest Winners

The October 2016 Read to Win Contest winners are:

Lani Miller

Robert Hazzard

Susan Kaufmann

Congratulations! If your name appears above, you have been drawn from our e-newsletter subscriber list. Please contact EasyCare within 48 hours to claim your free pair of any EasyCare hoofboots or EasyShoes.

Be sure to read the EasyCare e-newsletter for your chance to win next month. Sign up at



TN Tuxedo at Farm Days

My Grand Daughter was invited to bring her horse to our county's annual Farm Days. Over 400 2nd graders met "Tux" and Jaden. The question of the day was, "What is he wearing on his feet?".  Jaden was proud to show and tell all about his Easyboot Gloves!

Name: Melanie 
State: Tennessee
Country: US
Equine Discipline: Trail
Favorite Boot: Easyboot Glove

Battle River CTR and Easyshoe Success

Submitted by Stacey Maloney, Team Easyboot 2016 Member

I wrote in a previous blog about getting my unfit mare fit for a 25 mile Competitive Trail Ride Competition and some of the challenges we were overcoming in regards to being overfed. CTR's are not new to us, we've been competing successfully for a few years now, but we've been really slow getting going this year as we added new young family member early in 2016. 

Well we dieted, we conditioned, we trimmed, we booted, and finally the competition was near so we glued! I had been taught by a local barefoot trimmer how to apply EasyShoes last year and I gave it a shot on my own as well in 2015 but hadn't picked up my Adhesive applicator in about 12 months. I had ordered some Easyshoe Performance earlier in the year and re-watched the instructional video's on how to apply them to jog my memory. Away I went and I made a MESS!

But messes were meant to be made and are easily cleaned up. Here's another messy foot!

You can see I don't have the ideal gluing environment. Gluing in the grass is not recommended but I make it work for us. I had much more confidence in myself this year; I felt really good about my process and I trusted that they would stay on. I am certain my confidence came from my practice last year, but as an extra precaution this year I made sure to have extra everything on hand in case I really messed something up. One of those old wives tales, as long as you have it you won't need it but the minute you don't have it..... well I had more than I needed and still do because all went according to plan.

The EasyShoes got a week of turn out, one road ride and one foothills ride before we headed out to our competition. 

We arrived at the Battle River CTR in Ponoka, AB when it was already in full swing as we had planned to ride on Day 2 of the competition. We did a leg stretching warm up ride that evening to work out some silliness, had our initial vet check which went great and tucked ourselves in for a chilly night of coyote and elk song. 

With a 7:15 am start time, I was up by 5 am and started prepping my horse and myself for the day. Food in for both of us, jammies off, competition gear on, warm up and off to the start line. We were first out and off we went into the sleet. We got to ride with a few other riders who caught up and passed us momentarily but my riding buddy's mount as well as mine had other plans about being left behind. We all cantered the first 7-8 miles to the vet check over the wet grass, through the creek and over some slippery mud. The first vet check was hidden but we pulsed down no problem and were off again in the lead. 

It wasn't long before we were over taken again and spent the rest of the day leap frogging with the other front runners. The ride seemed to be just flying by and we had such a great time with great company. The horses had excellent momentum all day and the scenery was lovely. 

Both the second and final vet check came much too fast and my first and last competition of the year was already over with. The vet out was uneventful and I felt really good about how my horse did that day. We got lots of compliments and questions about our hoof protection as it is still an uncommon choice up here but I hope I am leading by example and we will soon see more and more riders choosing options that let the hoof function more naturally than traditional hoof wear. 

We started and ended our CTR season with a solid second place finish and I couldn't be happier with my mare and our choice of hoof protection. She truly felt great all day, confident and stable in her way of going. Our riding buddy commented that she looked like she was floating. I know I sure was as this mare is my wings and those Easyshoes are her little jet packs!