American Hoof Association Webinar: Dental Health and Lameness Prevention

The American Hoof Association approaches equine care with a whole-horse approach. On Sunday, March 19th, expand your knowledge on how oral dynamics affect the well-being of an equine specifically relating to hoof care with Wendy Bryant, who received her education from the renowned Spencer LaFlure, Founder of Natural Balance Dentistry. Both stress the importance of equine dental health and symmetry because of it's bio-mechanical effects of the entire horse.

"Did you know that a dental malocclusion can affect the way a horse stands or moves? If the way a horse stands or moves has been compromised it will affect the way they wear their feet! Maybe you are fighting a stubborn crack or a flare that could find its genesis in dental imbalances." - Ruthie Thompson-Klein, AHA Education Committee. Learn more and sign up today!

American Hoof Association Webinar: Dental Health and Lameness Prevention

The American Hoof Association approaches equine care with a whole-horse approach. On Sunday, March 19th, expand your knowledge on how oral dynamics affect the well-being of an equine specifically relating to hoof care with Wendy Bryant and Spencer LaFlure. Both stress the importance of equine dental health and symmetry because of it's bio-mechanical effects of the entire horse. 

 

"Did you know that a dental malocclusion can affect the way a horse stands or moves? If the way a horse stands or moves has been compromised it will affect the way they wear their feet! Maybe you are fighting a stubborn crack or a flare that could find its genesis in dental imbalances." - Ruthie Thompson-Klein, AHA Education Committee. Learn more and sign up today!

Winter Ice Studs for the Easyboot Therapy Line-Up

Submitted by Mariah Reeves, EasyCare Customer Service Representative

EasyCare offers several products that can be used for assisting the healing process of several hoof-related conditions. The winter endorses situations that can make treatment all the more challenging. As ice season approaches, the use of studs in therapeutic hoof boots is in demand. Before drilling into your boots at the first sign of slick, it’s important to know which therapy boots are compatible with which ice studs that EasyCare offers.

EasyCare Quick Studs and EasyCare Original Ice Studs.

The Easyboot Rx, a go-to therapy boot, is suggested for stall use or very small turn out only. The boot is designed to be lightweight and breathable, which means it is not built to withstand large turnout conditions. If studs are necessary for the environment in which your horse wears the Rx, both the EasyCare Original Studs and the EasyCare Quick Studs may be used. However, it is important to monitor the Original Ice Studs as there is a small chance that the stud may migrate proximally within the boot. This could cause pressure to the sole if it goes unnoticed. Precautionary tip: The Rx boots include a 6mm Comfort Pad; after installing the studs, it’s a good idea to replace the Comfort Pad back into the boot to serve as a safeguard between the stud and the sole of the hoof. Sizes 00-4 take the 3/4" Original Ice Studs and size 5 and up take the 1" Original Ice Studs.

The Easyboot Transition, Easyboot Cloud, and Easyboot Rx.

The Easyboot Transition bridges the gap between a therapy boot and a pleasure riding boot. It offers durability that can hold up for light riding and a dual density sole that provides shock absorption and cushioning qualities. Because the Easyboot Transition presents a dual density sole, it is not recommended to use a stud that compromises it. Only the EasyCare Quick Studs are suggested for this particular boot style.

The Easyboot Cloud is the latest and greatest therapy hoof boot on the market. The Cloud is robust, yet comfortable and supportive. The Cloud Pad material compresses like memory foam and is designed to compress in a proportional relationship to the weight of the horse. The durability of the Easyboot Cloud allows the EasyCare Original Ice Studs or the EasyCare Quick Studs. Cloud sizes up to size 4 utilize the 3/4" Original Ice Studs. Sizes 5 and up take 1" Original Ice Studs. As a reminder, the Cloud is not intended to be used for riding purposes.

The Easyboot Zip and EasySoaker are not recommended for use with studs. For permanent traction, support and protection, check out Daisy's blog, "Have Ice, EasyShoes with Studs!".

Photo credit: Hank Blum

Using boots through the melting season will offer reassurance that your horse has adequate traction and support over the hard ground. Boots will eliminate balling up of snow in the sole and provide cushion until the Spring returns. Contact EasyCare to further discuss the best hoof boot option for your and your horse’s needs. 

Setting Your Therapy Boots Up for Extended Wear

Submitted by Jean Welch, Hoof Care Practitioner

As a Hoofcare Practitioner, I take great pride in knowing that I help provide comfort to horses on a daily basis. Most of us HCP's have horses of our own, and we have first- hand experience when it comes to successful booting techniques.
This has been a banner year for laminitic symptoms, and I’d like to share a few tips that will help extend the wear time for therapeutic boots such as the Easyboot Cloud and the Easyboot RX.

Maintaining comfortable booted hooves for extended wear (two to four days max. in dry conditions) is easier if you invest in a second set of boots so they can be rotated. They don’t have to be the same kind, as long as they fit well and offer comfort and support, and are appropriate for the task. This, along with diligent cleaning habits of both horse and equipment is a recipe for success. While one set of boots is being worn, the other set is cleaned and staged, ready for the next booting. To clean the boots simply drop them in a bucket of water with a few drops of mild detergent. Let them soak a while, then use a soft brush to scrub them out. Rinse and squeeze out as much water as possible, then hang to dry (not in direct sunlight).

Keeping the hooves dry and clean for extended boot wear is easier if you use liberal amounts of a medicated powder such as Gold Bond or a generic equivalent.  I also like to line the boot with an absorbent adult pad such as the Walgreens brand “Certainty”.

These pads are long, thick and absorbent. They are great for drawing out and locking away excess moisture from the frog area. I use them whole so that it cradles the pastern and heel bulbs.

Before.

After three days.

Depending on the boot style I’m using, sometimes I cut them into thirds, so I can get three hoof boot liners out of one pad.

The pad does not have to cover the entire sole to be effective. As long as it is centered under the frog,  it will work well. ​

The adhesive strip on the back secures the pad very nicely to the inside bottom of the boot. Remove only 1/3 of the adhesive backing so it only sticks to the comfort pad.

I stick the absorbent pad only to the comfort pad so that the rest of it cradle the heel bulbs, allowing it to move with the pastern, and provides extra cushioning and protection. Again here, I use powder to reduce friction and to keep things clean and dry. Be sure to clean the hoof,  hairline and pastern thoroughly with a soft brush before each booting.

No rubs aftwer 4 days.

No rubs even after 3 days.

There are lots different booting techniques out there. I hope this method offers some relief for your unique situation. 

How Easyboot Gloves Helped My Horse

Submitted by Karen Frogner, EasyCare Customer

Splash is an athletic, opinionated, gorgeous mare. She is my dream horse and in the three years that I have owned her we have developed a mutually respectful relationship.

I have always used Easyboot Gloves on her. I ride trails all year round and the Gloves have never let me down.

Recently she injured a tendon and was put on stall rest. The tendon was ultra sounded by my vet and determined that it was a minor strain. This was good news, as I know tendon injuries can often require long recovery time, and sometimes even worse. Unfortunately, about three weeks out from the tendon injury, I had just increased her paddock size, and she developed laminitis from a yet to be determined cause.

With the development of laminitis, she had to go back to stall rest, pads taped to her feet, and deep bedding. The pads did not reliably stay on. It was frustrating to check on her and find one, or both pads gone, buried in the shavings, and her digital pulses bounding again.

Out come the Gloves! I put pads into the Gloves, slipped them on, fastened the Velcro, and behold, she's comfortable and they are secure.

I clean out the boots twice a day, check the pads to make sure they are still providing some cushion, and walk away (off to work), confident she is going to be comfortable and continue to improve in her Gloves.

Thank you EasyCare for making such a great product!

 

No More Sore Feet!

Chronic right front hoof lameness resulted in removing both shoes for two weeks before radiographs could be taken. My boy appears much more comfortable wearing his Easyboot Clouds. He has been successfully hand walked and if the weather stays dry, we might attempt a supervised turnout. So grateful for these great boots.

Name: Heather 
State: California
Country: USA
Equine Discipline: Pleasure Riding
Favorite Boot: Easyboot Cloud

February 2017 Newsletter: New Hoof Protection Products in the R&D Phase at EasyCare

In this month's newsletter:

  • New Hoof Protection Products in the R&D Phase at EasyCare 

  • Positive Changes

  • Freedom Movement

  • Best Practice: What Glue Work Works?

​READ MORE HERE...

January 2017 Newsletter: 2016 Didn't Suck

In this month's newsletter:

  • 2016 Didn't Suck!

  • Clouds in the Rain

  • Mark, Mustangs, EasyShoes and Winning

  • Take a Chance and Flippin Run With It

READ MORE HERE...

The Merlinator

This is Merlin the mini. He came to me for some hoof rehab with severe laminitis. He currently lives on our track system with the big horses but has to wear a grazing muzzle to keep his weight down. As we all know the fastest way to recovery for these little guys is movement (among other things of course), however when you have sore feet you don't feel much like moving. Enter EasyCare Mini Hoof Boots! Merlin had never worn anything like them and as I had to order them from Oz I was a little worried they wouldn't be the perfect fit. Thankfully EasyCare Down Under made the whole thing easy and stress free. I really can't thank them enough. As soon as Merlin had them on it was like they were made fore him! He pranced up the road with the happiest look on his face. He just absolutely loves wearing them! He's now excited to go out and about knowing he will have comfy toes. Thanks EasyCare for making the Merlinators life that much more enjoyable. 

Name: Peta 
Country: New Zealand
Equine Discipline: Other
Favorite Boot: Easyboot Mini


At Least Once

Yes, I truly believe that each Hoof Care Professional should attend the yearly International Hoof-Care Summit in Cincinnati, Ohio at least one time in their life. It is an event packed to the brim with lectures and seminars. Organized by the AFJ, this year attendance was in the thousands. Farriers from all over the world attended and it is a great opportunity to meet them and exchange experiences. 

EasyCare Inc and Polyflex Horseshoes had partnered up and shared a booth side by side at the Summit. Great experience to work with Curtis Burns, in my opinion, the most experienced and best Hoof Care Professional in terms of gluing synthetic and polyurethane horse shoes.

EasyCare and Polyflex booth at the trade show.

 The Bootmeister explaining the advantages of the EasyCare products to visitors from all over the world.

Curtis Burns demonstrated quarter crack repair in front of many trade show attendees. 

Garrett Ford had some airline problems, so unfortunately he did not make it to the Trade Show. Some of the newest products developed by EasyCare, and meant to be showcased in Cincinnati, also fell victim to flight cancellations. Therefore the EasyCare Booth did not have all the new products at hand. Nevertheless, we had some of the newest and exciting EasyCare products on display and in cooperation with Curtis, I made it a go.

One of my all time favorite boots, the EasyBoot Flip-Flop, on display on the blacksmith buddy.

A joint production with Polyflex Horseshoes, the EasyShoe Flex is scheduled to get released onto the market in March. Watch this video here that explains the benefits of the Flex. The EasyShoe Flex will first be released in four sizes: 0, 1, 2 and 3. With a springsteel core, this shoe will flex just about like a hoof, like nature intended. The Flex is meant to be nailed on. Options are a dorsal clip or side clips. Another option is open heel or closed heel for frog support. Garrett Ford talked a little bit more about this in last weeks blog.

Not only was the Trade show a huge success with products on display from companies all over the world, the lecture series was filled with capable and iconic speakers like Mike Wildenstein, Simon Curtis, Dave Farley and my all time favorite: Brian Hampson. Brian has done extensive research on the Australian Brumbies and the Mongolian Takh horses like no other scientist in the world. His research has influenced the way we are looking and judging horse hooves in recent times. 

In Brian's lectures, you can learn a lot about the wild horses of the world. For example, did you know that 46% of all wild horses with hooves that we often consider ideal suffer from laminitis?

Photo from Brian Hampson's lecture. 

Looking at these hooves of wild mustangs in the image below, one might think of these being the ideal hooves everybody is striving to achieve.

What Brian Hampson found out in his numerous studies puts a damper on this illusion: these hooves might look appealing from the outside, yet inside these hooves have the highest percentage of pathologies. Specifically founder, laminitis, white line disease, navicular etc.

In the slide below, Brian is detailing the percentages of the pathologies found in his studies of the wild horse hooves in Australia:

Compare the wild horse hooves in the image above to this one below, taken from a horse in a wetter environment and representing hooves we see more commonly among our domesticated herds:

On first sight, we all would probably agree that this hoof is somewhat neglected and unhealthy. 

Yet, when checking more closely with digital radiology, nuclear scintigraphy and ultrasound the inside of hooves looking like this, one is astonished to find out that these hooves were among the healthiest in Hampson's studies. So the first impression is not telling us the whole truth or might actually totally fool us. Take home message is that the external looks of a hoof will not allow us to draw conclusions and pass judgement on how "healthy" the actual hoof, its internal structures and the digit inside really are. Interesting, isn't it? It sure taught me a lesson. That is the kind of invaluable stuff you learn at the Summit.

The learning experience all around was just amazing and, quite frankly, there is no better way to learn about Hoof Care, the newest scientific findings, meeting new friends and reconnecting with old ones but by attending the "Summit". See you there next year!

 

From the desk of The Bootmeister

Christoph Schork

Global Endurance Training Center