Tucker's Club Foot and the Easyboot Back Country

Tucker is an off the track Thoroughbred whom we rescued. He came to us with poor body condition, lots of bones visible, rain rot covering his body, and his feet literally falling a part. Tucker has a club foot that resulted from a broken leg. With the help of knowledgeable people, we have watched Tucker heal from the inside out! He is a beautiful, kindhearted animal who loves all of the people who visit our farm! In spite of all of his progress, the club foot does not hold up to bug-stomping summers. Thanks to our farrier and Kelsey Lobato, EasyCare Product Specialist, Tucker now has a new pair of Easyboot Back Country boots to protect his hooves! Thanks EasyCare for your help in this process!

Name: Jen Leyes
State: Virginia
Equine Discipline: Dressage
Favorite Boot: Easyboot Glove Back Country

Original Easyboot Making Life Easier.

The Belgian mare I drive has always had soft, tender feet that couldn't keep a shoe on. During the year she was on Farrier's Formula 2x and she wore the Original Easyboot on her front feet when in use with great success and comfort to her. They allowed her hooves to toughen up and grow out perfectly. I still use them on her when I know we will encounter rocky ground because I prefer to keep her barefoot instead of shoes. We love Easyboots!


Name: Elizabeth Bridges
State: New Hampshire
Equine Discipline: Trail
Favorite Boot: Original Easyboot

August 2017 Newsletter: Best Seller Easyboot Glove On Sale!

In this month's newsletter:

  • Don't Give Me Any Lip!
  • My Foundered Horse is Finally Stable...Right?
  • Tips and Tricks for Removing Shells Using Acrylic
  • Who is Kelsey and Why is She Important?

​READ MORE HERE...

Tips and Tricks for Gluing and Removing Shells Using Acrylic

Submitted by Philip Himanka, Not Only Barefoot LLC

The preparation before the application of a Glue-On is what makes a difference in longevity and strength of bond between product and the hoof. Contained in this blog are some things to take in consideration.

I will start with at the end with the removal process: If you are not thinking about how difficult it is going to be to remove the Glue-On shells, then you will do a better job gluing. I've found that the best way to pull them off is with a pair of dull nippers. If you take your time and your horse does not wiggle then the shell might peel off intact enough to reuse it. Usually, when you are ready to pull/peel them off, there will be a small separation towards the heels.

First, get the corner of your nippers and wedge it in. If its not cracked like in this picture you might need to rasp the edge a bit.

Second, close your nippers and use the leverage outwardly in a peeling motion.

Third, the edge of the shell will start to separate so work your way forward until you get to the center. Go back and keep peeling deeper until the rim at the lower edge of the shell pops. You will usually hear a sound. Move yourself to the other side of the limb and repeat the process.

The shell has more flexibility than the glue so if you peel it off instead of prying it will leave the glue adhered to the hoof wall and then you can just buffer out the glue gently.

I think this process is very important in order to conserve the integrity of the hoof wall. I find that if you buffer/sand instead of rasping you can do consecutive gluing applications without taking a significant layer of thickness of the hoof wall. Note: This process will work also for the gluing of shoes like the EasyShoe Performance.

Now I will discuss the application process. It is important for you to consider, regardless of the kind of riding you will be doing, the length of time you are planning to leave them on.

If you are planning to leave them on for less than one week you can use either glue types such as acrylics, EasyShoe Bond and urethanes, Vettec Adhere. For sole protection and comfort a silicon base or dental impression material, such as Shufill dental impression, is a good idea. Note: For short periods of time, the Sikaflex has proven to be the best in any kind of condition because of its sticky, flexible and sealing properties.

If you are going to leave them glued for 6 weeks or so, the process I recommend is more specific (leaving the shells/shoes glued more than 7-8 weeks can be detrimental to the angles of the hoof). My experience has been that the acrylic works best for longer applications due to the following properties:

- It's more flexible and is less likely to crack or become brittle over time, so it moves with the hoof. This is great because you want the heels to expand and move independently from each other (that is what I love about the Love Child).

- Seals better from water and moisture.

- You can add copper sulfate when you are mixing the glue in order to prevent thrush.

I've also found very important when you are going to leave them glued for a longer time to consider this:

- Leave the back of the foot open so the softer caudal tissue can be in contact with air.

- If you are applying any kind of sole support including pads, it is important to apply thrush prevention products. What I do is after the glue is set, I sprinkle some copper sulfate powder or granules in the heel, then I pack in a clay based anti-thrush product, Artimud is a good option.

You really want to use clay based products regarding thrush not only because they have a better prevention effect but they also keep their properties longer. Note: If you want to be successful regarding thrush and your horse lives in a wet environment it will be very helpful to pack anti-thrush clay at least once a week from the heel into the collateral groves of the frog and central sulcus.

My Foundered Horse is Finally Stable...Right?

Your horse gets sore feet. He is diagnosed with laminitis and founder. You have a good TEAM: Veterinarian, Farrier, and Caretaker, who help you address your horse's underlying metabolic condition and provide rehabilitative care. The horse becomes sound, and returns to his normal personality and, if you're lucky, his pre-laminitic level of performance. You can finally relax and breathe.   

Or can you?   

I began my hoof care journey in 2004 because of my own horse who foundered. I had a wonderful farrier at that time who put the rasp in my hand and empowered me to help my horse. With the veterinarian, we identified his insulin resistance and eventual Cushing's syndrome. He became sound and went back to a fabulous dressage career, retiring many years later due to EPM. You can read his story here: https://www.daisyhavenfarm.com/case-studies/windy

Windy, post-laminitis, back to work and winning in the show ring.

Fast forward to today. Windy is now 29 years old. He has been in excellent health and quite sound; metabolically stable, until last fall. I try to assess body condition on my own horses once a week, and Windy had become quite thin, even though he was eating well. He was a 3.5 body condition score (BCS) on the Henneke Body Condition Scale, ribs and hips sticking out. Looking back, I only have this image of him at that time, taken out of a video of the pony you see in the foreground:

I increased his feed for six weeks and when that didn't improve his weight I worked with our farm veterinarian to eliminate other causes of his condition:

-Teeth were assessed and re-addressed by our excellent dentist, but weren't the issue.

-No symptoms of ulcers, or other pain and discomfort leading to weight loss.

-Cushing's and insulin resistance were controlled based on blood work.

-Basic blood work all normal except for indicators of intestinal inflammation. We wormed Windy aggressively as he is a worm shedder. We also wondered if he possibly had internal tumors.

Interestingly, at that time, Windy's foot condition was also fairly poor with thin, retracted soles. We put him in EasyShoe Performance with dental impression material to support the frog and sole.  

By January, Windy was finally looking better. Until one day, upon assessing Windy's body condition, I realized he was now a 6 BCS, slightly overweight and decided to back off the feed. His soles were no longer retracted and he looked much healthier!  

But was he? The weight difference between 3.5 to 6 BCS was significant in a fairly short period of time, when he hadn't been underfed to begin with. Maybe the intestinal inflammation resolved somehow? I was unsatisfied with such a mystery. I hypothesized my horse was actually a skinny old horse whose metabolic condition was no longer controlled. Even though he had gained weight and looked "good" to me, perhaps it was really an indicator he was in trouble.

Our veterinarian agreed and we tested Windy metabolically:

ACTH: 39 pg/mL ( > 35 considered elevated)

Insulin: 58 uU/mL ( > 42 considered elevated)

Glucose: 102 mg/dL  (Lab reference range 70-120)

The blood results don't look alarming: Insulin only mildly elevated, ACTH a seemingly minor difference, and glucose normal. However, Windy had very similar blood work when he originally foundered in 2004.   So I was very concerned. In these situations, the Glucose:Insulin (G:I) ratio can be quite helpful: 

From ECIRHorse.com, one of the leading resources for managing Cushing's and insulin resistant horses:  

"What is the G:I Ratio?  The Glucose to Insulin Ratio (G:I ratio) is a very simple concept.  This ratio/number indicates how many “units” of insulin are being secreted per “unit” of glucose.  The smaller the number, the less sensitive the cells are to the insulin.  For example, a normal horse may have a blood sugar of 100 and an insulin of 10, for a G:I ration of 100/10 = 10:1, where an insulin resistant horse may have an insulin of 25 for that same blood sugar of 100, yielding a G:I ratio of 100:25 = 4:1.  Both insulins may be within the laboratory’s “normal range”, but these normals represent a variety of diets and various times after eating.  Obviously the horse that has a circulating insulin level 250% higher than other horses with the same blood sugar level is less sensitive to insulin.  A ratio < 4.5:1 is diagnostic for Insulin Resistance, while a ratio between 4.5:1 and 10:1 represents compensated IR."

Windy's G:I ratio was 1.76 = Severe IR, high laminitis risk.

The G:I ration confirmed my concerns, that his mildly elevated blood results were not the whole picture.  In order to gather more information, we decided to test Windy even further with a glucose tolerance test.  

The glucose tolerance test assesses the horse's insulin response to a dose of Karo syrup at 60 minutes and 90 minutes. Additionally we gathered a pre-Karo syrup insulin sample as a baseline. A horse whose insulin levels test within the laboratory reference range would indicate normal response and normal metabolic function.  

Windy's insulin values came back highly elevated, above the testable range:

Pre: > 200 uIU/mL (Reference range 0-20)

Post @ 60 minutes: > 200 uIU/mL (Reference range 0-45)

Post @ 90 minutes: > 200 uIU/mL (Reference range 0-45)

This test was definitive. It is important to remember that the baseline metabolic blood work panel is only showing you a moment in time. So the insulin taken in the initial panel result of 58 uIU/dL, being mildly elevated, was catching a low moment. Where the pre-glucose tolerance test insulin showed us a different moment, and one that was of much greater concern, which validated the G:I ratio.

I wish there had been some way to know that the pre-Karo syrup insulin was so high. We probably would not have done the glucose tolerance test if the initial insulin had been that high. However, it did give me a clearer picture of my horse's laminitis risk status.

By being proactive and asking questions, I was able to identify that my horse's underlying metabolic condition was not truly controlled and a contributing factor to his weight change. It is imperative to be vigilant when managing the Cushing's/insulin resistant horse by working with your veterinarian and utilizing these diagnostic tools to be objective when needed.

www.DaisyHavenFarm.com
www.IntegrativeHoofSchool.com

Who is Kelsey and why is she important?

My name is Kelsey Lobato and I just started my journey here at EasyCare Inc. I am excited to be a part of the EasyCare Product Specialist Team. Helping to provide fellow equine enthusiasts and competitors achieve a higher level of performance with their barefoot horses is something that I am proud to do. Whether it is out on the trail or discussions over the phone, I look forward to assisting horses and their human counterparts with EasyCare products. I also look forward to further educating individuals about barefoot practices.

I have a Bachelor's Degree in Art, Minor in Art History, and an Associates in Equine Studies from Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO. I was able to achieve my certification in Equine Studies with a full scholarship appointed by the director of Weasel Skin Ranch and Fort Lewis College Agriculture program. I studied, trained and worked at Weasel Skin Ranch, as well as worked and trained at Mountain High Ranch. Most, if not all, of the horses I have worked with are barefoot horses.

My Warrior Horse, Summer Flame at Cowboy Poetry Charity Ride Rapp Corral .

In my second week working at EasyCare Inc, I was given the opportunity to work with the Easyboot Glue-On shoe. Below are some pictures of our owner Garrett and I working together to get his horse Cyclone, fitted to his new Glue-On shells. Jumping right on in!

Prepping for the Glue-On.

After personally doing and seeing how the EasyCare Glue-Ons are applied, I can say that the most important thing is being consistent and precise with prep work on your horse's hooves, before gluing on the shoes. Taking your time to prep, being attentive to your horse and following the proper protocol is the best way to succeed at gluing on your horses new shoes.

I consider myself one of the lucky people in this world as someone who owns horses and is able to work with horse people from all different backgrounds. I have always been head over heels in love with horses. My mother use to go around telling folks that I was a kid twenty-five percent of the time and the other seventy-five percent was spent being a horse. Now as an adult, with the knowledge and career that I have gained through training my own horses, teaching lessons, working on ranches and continuing to grow in my passion and career, I can better access what each EasyCare customer will need for their horses.

“Let your dreams run wild and be brave enough to follow” –Aguas Caliente Apache 

August 2017 Read To Win Contest Winners

The August 2017 Read to Win Contest winners are:

Phil Waspi

Kim Hudson

Nancy Fredrick

Marty Burton

Congratulations! If your name appears above, you have been drawn from our e-newsletter subscriber list. Please contact EasyCare within 48 hours to claim your free pair of any Easyboots or EasyShoes.

Be sure to read the EasyCare e-newsletter for your chance to win next month. Sign up at easycareinc.com/newsletter_subscribe.aspx.

 

Don't Give Me Any Lip!

It's actually all about the lip!

I did a personal Facebook post last week that stated "I'm gonna go out on a limb and say the Easyboot Glue-On shell is the most successful product in the 62 year history of the Tevis Cup 100 mile horse race. The rock with your name on it can no longer spell your name". 

The Easyboot Glue-On shell has won the Tevis Cup in 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2016. The Easyboot Glue-On shell has won the Haggin Cup in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 and 2016. Over the same years the finish rate for Easyboot horses was 63% compared to 50.77% for non Easyboot horses. This is the most difficult race in the world. A world where you can't fake success and results speak volumes.

The Fury showing for the Haggin Cup. Notice the heel first landing after 100 miles.  

The Fury showing off a heel first landing.

Why the success? Although I believe the success of the product in the most difficult 100 mile race in the world is attributed to many factors, the rear LIP on the shell is a huge advantage over the difficult and rocky terrain. I believe the reason the product has been so successful is the back lip of the shell that covers a bit of the heels and bulbs. I believe the downhill and hidden rocks take a toll on the horses. The horses start to get heel sore (especially when landing heel first). When the horses start the get sore in the heels everything changes. Strides shorten and they don't want to go downhill and the last 30 miles of the Tevis are downhill. The back lip of the Easyboot Glue-On shell does more than people think and is a huge advantage for the downhill, rocky trail.  

Take a look at the photo below. Look how the rear lip is protecting the heel in the rocky conditions. Imagine how the heel of the horse would impact the rocks without the rear lip of the shell. Imagine how the horse feels after 100 miles of difficult trail conditions? The back of the foot is designed to take the load. I believe when the heel gets sore the heel first landing goes away, stride shortens and performance is greatly reduced.

Take a look at the photo below. Carol Federighi on her way to winning the 2017 Vermont 100. Check out the heel first landing. Imagine the horse landing in rocks and what happens to the heel over a 100 mile race. Imagine what the "Lip" is doing to protect the horse in rough footing.  

Giving your horse some "lip" for the next difficult event may just be the edge you and your horse are looking for. 

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof boot for the barefoot horse.

July 2017 Newsletter: 15% Off The Easyboot Rx!

In this month's newsletter:

  • Modifications of Easyboot Glove and Glue On Shells: Part II
  • Blaze and the Many, Many Boots
  • The EasyShoe FLEX in Action
  • Why is the Easyboot Rx the best medical boot in the industry?

​READ MORE HERE...

Why is the Easyboot Rx the best medical hoof boot in the equine industry?

The Easyboot Rx is different than the other medical boots in the equine industry!

1.  Close contact. The cushioning is built into the sole, the sole is the cushion. The unique design doesn't stand a compromised horse on 2 inches of pad and sole. The additional thickness of other solutions put the horse on the equivalent of high heels. Imagine walking around in high heels with a sore foot.  

Less that 20mm at the thickest part of the sole.

2.  Light Weight. A #2 Easyboot Rx weighs less than 3/4 lbs. The competitor products weight more then 2 lbs.  

Less than 3/4 of a pound.

3.  Affordable. The Easyboot Rx is the most affordable medical boot on the market. You can find the Easyboot Rx at $62.05 in the market place.  

4.  Easy to apply. The back of the Rx folds out of the way making application easy. Application over a bandage is no sweat.

Quick and Easy to Apply.

4.  Warranty. The Easyboot Rx is covered by the most extensive warranty in the industry. If you are not 100% satisfied in the first 30 days send them back.  

5.  The Easyboot Rx is on sale for the month of July. 15% Off of the Easyboot Rx. Offer valid July 1-31, 2017. Offer applies to domestic and international customers, wholesalers, retailers, veterinarians and hoof care practitioners. May not be combined with other offers. Limit one order per customer and maximum discount amount of $250.00. Place your order at orders.easycareinc.com and use coupon code RX717 at checkout.

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President & CEO

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof boot for the barefoot horse.