EasyShoe Flex is Trending

Curtis Burns, of Polyflex Horseshoes, and I have been working on a shoe for many months. Too many months to be candid. The project has taken longer than expected, cost more than anticipated and has made us both more bald. Frustrating, but if bringing a product to market was easy, everyone would do it.  

I did a recent Facebook post on my personal page about the EasyShoe Flex and the post was quickly shared over 1K in a very short time. The shoe and the features of the shoe appear to have some interest.  

A urethane and steel shoe that allows hoof mechanism. Roughly 3.8mm of displacement in the quarters just standing on a nut.  

Curtis and I set out to develop a nail on horse shoe that would provide many unique features. A shoe that would absorb concussion, be easily applied with nails and would allow the hoof to move and flex. Our goal was the following.

1.  Easy application with nails. The shoe can also be applied with adhesive, if needed.

Heart bar version.

2.  A steel or aluminum core that would allow farriers to set the nails and apply a solid clinch.

3.  We wanted a shoe that would move and flex with the hoof.  

 

Rigid, but flexible!

4.  A shoe that would absorb concussion and would outlast iron.  The wide web design is hard to wear out and we believe it will outwear iron.  

5.  We wanted a shoe with sturdy toe and quarter clips.

Sturdy toe and quarter clips. The spring steel is different to work with but the clips can be set nice and flush.

6.  We wanted a urethane shoe that would not cup and apply sole pressure with time.  

7.  A shoe with a heart bar and open heel option.

Open heel.

Heart bar.

We ended up with a bonus product we will call the EasyShoe Light. Same as the heart bar above but with no metal. This version will be priced very aggressively and will compete with the 100% urethane shoes on the market.  

EasyShoe Light.

After nearly two years, we are close to launching a product that we believe has have achieved our goals. A shoe that we view as a "Tweener". More rigid than a urethane shoe and more flexible than steel or aluminum. Another tool for farriers to make the horse happy. In the end the horse is the ultimate customer. If the horse is happy in the new shoe, we will know if the project was a success. 

Would love to hear your thoughts and comments.  

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof boot for the barefoot horse.

 

Not All Composite Shoes Are Equal

One of the biggest advantages of composite shoes and glue is the wide variety of styles and application methods that are successfully used to help horses! However, if you talk to 100 Hoof Care Providers you'll get 99 different opinions about what you can and can't do with these materials.  

"You can't glue to the sole." I glue to the sole all the time.

"Dental impresson material doesn't stay in composite shoes." It does for me every day!  

And the best one....

"Glue-on shoes can only be used for a short period of time because the glue breaks down the hoof and wall." Tell that to the dozens of horses I have in glue-on shoes every month with no break for over 10 years! Their feet are perfectly healthy with no wall defects or problems.

But there are definitely nuances to these materials that can make or break your success! What is it that I'm doing specifically to lead to success? I believe that comes down to the quality and selection of materials being used in each situation, as well as the education, experience and skill of the person applying them.  

I have worked hard to develop my skills in using these materials over the last 13 years. I study every shoe and every glue and every nuance of application I can. There is no reason to believe that just because you trim or shoe horses, that using glue and composite shoes, wouldn't have as many nuances as variations in trim styles, or in metal shoe selection and application!  

Here is an example of someone who had good intentions to help this foundered horse, but their selection of materials and lack of experience in applying them led to problems for the horse.



The well-meaning farrier had applied a home made composite shoe that he glued on and the horse became lame. 

I was called in to see if I could come up with a different solution to the horse being sore footed. The idea of Glue-On composite shoes was excellent for this horse. By selecting the EasyShoe Performance, Acrylic Glue, Dental Impression Material and some hoof casting, this horse had a very different response.

This is right after shoeing with EasyShoes and hoof casting.

The hoof casting was beneficial in the beginning to stabilize this horse's hoof capsule. We removed the wings off the EasyShoe and used casting to add stability to the horse's foundered foot. After he was more comfortable and the inflammation had calmed down, we eliminated the casting and went with EasyShoe Performance applied with the attached wings.

After a short period of time, the horse was back to work in his EasyShoes.

This is just a quick example of how small details can make or break your success when using glue and composite materials! Maybe the difference for this horse was adding frog support, or the acrylic vs. urethane glue. My recommendation is like anything, the more you study and learn, the more tricks you have in your toolbox, the better prepared you are to help the horse! Not all Glue-on composite shoe applications are created equally. They are just a tool in the person's hands!  

www.DaisyHavenFarm.com

www.IntegrativeHoofSchool.com

Glue On Clinic at Canoga Farrier Supply, Canoga California

Submitted by Jon Smedley, Trim and Train

Hosted by Jon Smedley and Sarah Smedley of Trim and Train as well as Larkin Greene of Vettec

We don’t need to go to the farrier supply store because we get most of our supplies from EasyCare Inc. but I do like to go to look around and stay connected to the local shop. I’m like a kid in a candy store and my wife Sarah gets super anxious as the nice lady at Canoga Farrier Supply rings up the small stack of tools and toys that I just cannot leave without.

Last year, Julie, the store manager, suggested we have a glue-on clinic because a few of her regular customers where asking a lot of questions about EasyShoes. Those that had tried them were having a lot of failures. I figured it was just ‘small talk’ and she was not really serious. When she asked again a few months later, I realized she was serious.

Julie and, the shop owner, Bobby helped open the clinic to the public for FREE. Larkin Greene of Vettec is always offering to help at an event so I knew we’d have a great clinic. EasyCare was kind enough to send a box with some Glue-On shells and EasyShoe Performance N/Gs that fit our hoof buddies as well as some EasyShoe Bond for demonstrations and practice. Bobby and I estimated around 12 people would attend the clinic. 

Larkin’s display of Vettec products

Other manufactures got wind of our clinic and wanted to get involved. We had Epona, Sound Horse, and Renegade send products for us to play with and Hawthorne paid for breakfast and lunch.

On Saturday morning, 21st of October at 9am, the shop was packed. I counted 53 people at one stage, not including presenters. At introductions, we found that the crowd was made up of professional farriers with over 30 years experience that were there to expand their knowledge and skill base, as well as horse owners that just wanted to learn more about the glue on options.

Larkin led off with a great presentation about glue and a lot of information to keep you thinking. I wrapped things up with an overview of the processes that I have found to be helpful in keeping glue-on products on successfully! 

After the class room portion we adjourned to the parking lot for hands-on demonstration and practice. Sarah and I had a wonderful time answering more specific questions and spending some individual time outside with a great group.

My favorite question of the day, “How long have you been working for EasyCare?” which I was asked multiple times. (Jon is not an employee of EasyCare, but rather a valued dealer of EasyCare products since 2014).

Jon demonstrates how to heat fit a glove shell in the beautiful California sun.

Jon explaining the importance of using the Dremel 9931 bit and some techniques.

Trim and Train, based out of Ventura, California, are a husband and wife team that specialize in providing hoof care and protection for performance and leisure horses. The pair got their start in the barefoot community with PHCP and are enjoying facilitating training opportunities for other hoof care professionals.

What Easyboot Is Right For My Horse?

Submitted by Jordan Junkermann, EasyCare Product Specialist 

Some of you may be new to the booting world. I am only a year into this experience, so I'm still new to booting. There are many factors that lead us towards booting our horses. Some have always had barefoot horses, some are just removing iron shoes to begin the long journey to a healthy, happy foot, or maybe you are one of the all too common cases of laminitis, founder, navicular, or another hoof disease and are desperately looking for comfort and relief for your equine friend.

So here you are, searching the internet for a hoof boot company that will work for you. There seems to be an overwhelming amount of directions you could go. If you find yourself on our EasyCare website then you have tab after tab of options: Pleasure Riding, Performance, Therapy, or EasyShoes. How do you choose which boot is best for you? One option is to narrow down what you are wanting to use the boot for. That often helps point you in the right direction, but now you have to begin the trial and error process of getting a good fit. Luckily, you are not alone in this journey. We have a few different resources for you to gather as much information as you need to make the best decision, including each boot description, our blog site, videos on our YouTube page, the fitting assistant form, the EasyCare Fit Kit (Glove/Back Country and EasyShoe) or our highly educated Product Specialist Team. EasyCare’s mission is to improve the well-being of horses by providing the equestrian community with superior service, education, and innovative equine products.

As an employee with EasyCare and new to booting I have had the opportunity to try out a few of our boots. My mare, Pistol, is barefoot and only tender occasionally. I use the boots for riding on rocky Colorado terrain, but there are many boots in our lineup that would work for the type of riding I do. The biggest determining factors are her hoof shape and the length of her trimming cycle.

The first boot I tried was the Easyboot Epic. It is forgiving in fit and designed for longer trimming cycles, such as the 6-8 week trim cycle Pistol is on currently. I wanted a positive first booting experience and the Easyboot Epic is a good place to start. The application process is not incredibly difficult although getting the heel strap in the right place and the cable tightened just right can take a few tries to get accustomed to. Unfortunately, my mare was not used to going through water crossings at this point and attempted to avoid the water by climbing a few trees. In the process of hoping across the stream, like a frog might, she tore one of her gaiters on a sharp rock. I don’t blame the boot. She was acting wilder than she would have normally and the location for that tantrum was not ideal. Since then I have removed the gaiters and created the Original Easyboot instead of replacing the ripped gaiter.

The second boot I have used is the Easyboot Glove. This is definitely one of my favorites. I love the slim fit which allows her to move freely at any speed and doesn’t allow debris to enter the soft tissue areas near the hoof.  Although I appreciate the functionality of this boot, it only works for my horse for part of her trimming cycle. This boot is designed to accommodate 4 weeks of growth so that there is a snug, secure fit throughout that time period, so I can only use this boot the first couple of weeks unless I rasp her hoof down. If someone has the financial ability to, I would suggest they purchase a size that fits the first part of the trimming cycle and another set that fits for the last part if they have a longer trimming cycle.

I also tried the Easyboot Back Country since that boot has the same snug fit as the Glove but is more forgiving in fit. I had some trials with that boot as I transitioned into full barefoot. Her heel bulb angle didn’t allow for me to get the velcro to close the way that EasyCare suggests. I modified the boots by adding a half size up larger upper and that solved my problem.

My favorite “slip-on-and-go” boot is the Easyboot Trail. That boot slides on with no effort the first day after the trim and the last day before the next trim. It is always easy to just put the hoof into and it stays secure. There is no turning or twisting. I am lucky and have fairly good connection around the top of the boot: a little bit of space but not huge gapping. Some debris has gotten into the boot but it is easy to shake out at the end of a ride. If someone is concerned about rocks getting into the boot the best option would be to use a human sock to prevent rocks from getting in or the Gaiters that come with the Old Mac's G2.

This past spring, my mare went into a very intense heat cycle. She was pacing when she was in her pen so much that she was wearing her feet down a lot. She wasn’t ride-able because she was so sore. I used the Easyboot Transition, that is now discontinued and in our Bargain Bin. The Cloud or Rx boot would have worked just as well I put them on her when she was stalled so she could not wear anymore of her hoof down.

I am fortunate enough to have a horse with a hoof shape that fits in many of our boots. Some horses will have limited options and that will help narrow down the boot possibilities. We have a variety of sizing charts in order to accommodate a variety of hoof shapes. It is hard to fit every horse out there even with seven different sizing charts.

Everyone has had their own stories, good and bad about the boots they have tried. It can be overwhelming to try and pick the boot that is right for you. Feel free to contact the EasyCare Product Specialist Team, use our fitting assistant, or our other "Contact Us" resources to get advice on sizing for your horse. We are happy to help.

New Medical Boot System Coming to Market: Easyboot Stratus

Several months ago, Curtis Burns and I sat down and challenged each other to come up with a better medical hoof boot. We both felt the products on the market could be improved to better serve the laminitic and foundered horses. In addition, we felt a product line could be improved to give professionals more options during a treatment cycle. Our main goals were to develop a new boot with the following features:

The Easyboot Stratus in the prototype area.

1.  High quality materials.

2.  Soft internal materials to prevent rubbing.

3.  Fastening system and sole shape to prevent twisting.

4.  Tread system that accepts the EasyCare Therapy Click System.

5.  Each boot will come with a pad system.  

Easyboot Stratus.  Getting Close. 

One of the features of the boot that I'm most excited about is the fastening system. The system has an internal piece of webbing that hugs the contours of the horses heel when fastened. The webbing runs between the layers of the boot, doesn't actually touch the horse but places pressure in the right areas. This strap keeps the heel down and prevents twisting.   

Cut away view of the heel area.  Easy to see how the internal webbing strap holds the boot in place.

Non cutaway version shows how the webbing exits the boot. 

Each boot will come with a the Stratus Pad System and 15 stabilization rods. The system will allow professionals to custom design a pad for each horse and change the pad during the treatment cycle.  Rods are made of different densities and are inserted into the pad to add/change or remove cushion.  

The pad with 15 comfort rods. Different colors for different density.  

We are excited about the Stratus project and believe it will help horses and the professionals that treat them. Looking at a late 2017 or early 2018 launch.  

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof boot for the barefoot horse.

Easyboot Stratus Pad System: Get that Laminitic Horse Comfortable!

The Easyboot Stratus and the pad system are a collaboration between EasyCare/Polyflex Horseshoes and Garrett Ford/Curtis Burns.  We have been working to bring a new concept to market that will help horses. The comfort of the horse has been the main goal but we are also putting emphasis on a product that can be adjusted and changed for the horse as the needs of the horse change. In addition the system needs to hold up, stay in place and can't twist. We tried to look at the challenges laminitic/founder horses have now and provide a better solution. When asked about the project, Curtis offered the following.  

"When Polyflex Horseshoes and EasyCare first began working together, it quickly became obvious to me that just as the equine industry continued to improve, so would our products.Garrett had a way about him that never seemed to settle with "good enough" when it came to his company. According to him, every product could always be improved. It's that core business value that brought us to the Easyboot Stratus.

"My personal challenge was to redesign the sole insert. We needed a material that would withstand long term use while simultaneously offering therapeutic benefits to the horse. After research, trial & error we created a product we are truly excited about.

"Its honeycomb design is the most notable feature. We discovered that this pattern increases in stability as the horse loads weight onto their foot - making it ideal for horses requiring therapeutic feedback for extended periods of time. The new insert is soft enough to cushion the sole yet resilient enough to maintain its integrity. It offers a dependable, personalized level of comfort for horses who require a consistent level of therapeutic feedback."

The system comes with a pad and three densities of stabilization rods.

The holes go 80% through the pad.  The horse stands on the side without the holes.  

Rods are inserted in different areas of the pad to customize the experience for every horse.  Stiffen different areas with different densities.

Stabilization rods placed in the pad a cut to length

Hoof surface side

 The pad system will work both in the Easyboot Stratus and Easyboot Cloud hoof boots.  In addition the pads will be available to purchase and can be cut to fit other EasyCare hoof boot designs.  

"The relationship shared between Polyflex and EasyCare in itself is an example of professional collaboration for a common goal that we are proud to be a part of. Together we are working to create and improve products for the good of horse - and the Easyboot Stratus is just one example of many more to come," concluded Curtis.

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof boot for the barefoot horse.

The Easyboot Mini's Personal Impact

Submitted by Victoria Nodiff-Netanel of Mini Therapy Horses.

For years I’ve been searching for the perfect boots for my miniature therapy horses and EasyCare has created one that fits and functions like a dream! 

Mini Therapy Horses is an all volunteer nonprofit charity. Our mission is to bring hope, comfort and joy to children and adults in need with our 7 highly trained miniature therapy horses. Our little horse angels provide emotional, physical and positive mental benefits to those they visit with the help of our team of volunteers. Our specialty is helping people in crisis.

All of our tiny mares have a busy schedule. They are registered with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Civilian Volunteer Program, who can be called on at a moment’s notice 24/7 and are available for community outreach events like National Night Out, Emergency Preparedness events and LASD open houses. We have a special literacy program with Lieutenant Jennifer Seetoo bringing the minis to schools and LA County Public Libraries.

The horses comfort patients and staff in The Greater Los Angeles Veterans Hospital, the psychiatric wards, the Intensive Care Unit and VA Hospice. We’ve been committed to weekly visits in this hospital for over 8 years. We love the veterans and they love our horses! One of the many heartfelt interactions that has inspired me was when I received a Last Wish request from the head nurse of the VA Hospice in North Hills, CA. She had a terminal patient, Jerry, that requested to see my therapy horse Pearl as his last wish. He had met Pear when he was being in the Greater LA Veterans Hospital and it really touched his heart. Jerry had been taken in by a family on a farm in Germany and his fondest memories were of the horses he connected with as a frightened child. I went within days to visit Jerry with Pearl and it brought all the nurses to tears. Jerry talked to Pearl as he went in and out of consciousness while stroking her. They were communicating in their own language. Pearl knew what he needed. I heard a few days after our visit Jerry passed peacefully and I felt honored to have Pearl help him on his way.

Mini Therapy Horses are regular visitors at Ronald McDonald House East Hollywood and Pasadena where the families of children undergoing treatment for cancer and other critical medical procedures in nearby hospitals, get to stay free or at low cost.  The children are always excited to spend time with our tiny horses.

We have so many incredible experiences with the children and their families, and I’d like to share a few. Pearl and I visited with a little girl staying at Pasadena Ronald McDonald House that was going through critical procedures and had lost a leg to cancer. We hooked a lead on both sides of Pearl’s halter and off we went together with her walker and all! She was so overjoyed and felt like a normal kid walking a horse while Pearl pranced in her Easyboot Minis. Being able to lead a horse from a walker or wheelchair gives these kids a sense of empowerment and a memory they will never forget!

Another magical visit was with our volunteer Megan Sullivan and myself handling mini therapy horse Willow Blue and a child that was visually impaired. With sensitivity and compassion Megan took his hands and helped him navigate Willow from her ears to her hooves. He felt the warmth breath from her nostrils and ran his fingers through her fluffy mane. He was ecstatic with happiness and his mother was crying saying she had never seen him respond like that and be so engaged. This comfort and relief for the parents and siblings is vital to the health of the entire family and his support system. These experiences are the essence of what drives our hearts and our charity, Mini Therapy Horses.

Our relationship with EasyCare began when I met one of their representatives at an event in Santa Rosa where they were unveiling their new Easyboot Mini. I first had our horse Black Pearl put on a set of the smallest Mini boots on the market. The boot slipped on, was the perfect fit, and it looked gorgeous! In that moment Pearl and I felt like Cinderella and we both knew our search for the perfect boots for our miniature therapy horses was over! Our lives were changed forever!

We are so thankful for EasyCare’s sponsorship, supplying all our therapy horses with their fantastic boots. Our equine family adjusted seamlessly to the feel of the boots and we love the ability to conform the boots to each hoof with the Velcro straps. The integrity of the construction of their boot is very impressive. They hold up beautifully with lots of use. The EasyCare Mini boots match the work that we do helping grieving communities and children and adults in crisis. As members of the Los Angeles Mayor’s Crisis Response Team the horses are secure in all situations and look very professional. It’s so important to feel confident in a product we’re endorsing. It is important that it meets the high standards of our therapy organization and the people and agencies we work with.

I’ve trained the horses to do many tricks that are tools to break the ice, promote interaction between patients, and bring joy to those withdrawn, depressed and in pain. They all play a battery operated keyboard, give a high five, they smile and stand on their hind legs, kick balls, squeak toys and of course, bow. At any time we might be requested to visit an at-risk youth center like A Place Called Home in South Central, LA, Newton Police Station, Maryvale Orphanage, a home to console families that experienced a traumatic event, a busy street fair, or a school. The minis are able to perform in their boots and feel calm and secure doing these activities. The boots are practical and have a neat and clean appearance. The Mini boots complete our horses professional uniforms including their vests, halters and leads.

Aside from looking beautiful, I have full confidence knowing my horses will be able to comfortably move with ease and stability on a variety of surfaces. At the Veterans Hospital they shine the floors so well you can see your reflection in them. We love walking down the corridors in our Easy Boot Minis knowing we won’t we slipping and sliding! Nothing makes me happier than to see the kids at Ronald McDonald House feel so empowered when they double leash walk the little horse with us, all decked out with shoes, bows, a sparkly halter and a vest with an embroidered flying horse.

These boots are lightweight but at the same time tough and durable allowing Black Pearl and Blue Moon to show off their standing abilities! This trick on some surfaces could be potentially dangerous for our girls without their trusty boots. The flexibility of the boots allows for the natural movement of the legs. Whether we are at in a hospital room visiting a patient, with the children at Ronald McDonald House, de-stressing law students in the UCLA Library or doing community service with the LASD, the Easyboot Minis are sure to protect our horse’s tiny hooves.

I always laugh when we are getting ready to go on a visit and pull out the boots, because the horses KNOW we are headed out on a mission helping people all over Los Angeles.

January 1st , Mini Therapy Horses will be participating in the 2018 Tournament of Roses Parade proudly sporting the Easyboot Minis on our 7 therapy horses. This year’s theme is “Making a Difference” and EasyCare has truly made a difference in our lives in helping our horse’s ability to help others in need!

Thank you, EasyCare.

Who We Are

The American Association of Equine Practitioners presented recently a study by Keith Kleine, MS Director of Industry Relations, about the current trends in the horse industry in the USA. The overall picture shows a steady decline of the horse population in the USA, as well as a substantial decline in the horse registrations of all breeds.

Below some graphs of the present make up of horses and horse owners within the USA and their development trends:

 

 

 

Now to the present trend that has been observable for the last decade and a half:

These stats paint a sad picture of the horse industry. Surveys among horse owners reveal some of the reasons for the overall decline:

If interested in the whole detailed presentation of Mr. Keith Kleine, you can visit this site: Current Trends In The Horse Industry

Besides the economic stress factors, the horse industry has other challenges to deal with:

 

- Younger generations have multiple other interests besides horses and riding

- Increased public concern about horse welfare

- Decreased public knowledge about horses and what constitutes  good horsemanship

For all of us who love horses and their companionship, these statistics  above give reasons for concern. How can we, the national and international horse community, stop and maybe reverse that trend? A few ideas come into my mind:

- Education of the public about the horse sports and animal welfare

- Setting an example for good animal husbandry and horsemanship

- Working at the community level within local horse clubs 

- Lobbying at state and federal level for horse trails, facilities and equestrian sports

- Joining equestrian clubs and associations

- Writing blogs, articles, letters to the editors 

EasyCare has been a leader in the horse industry in terms of innovation of horse and rider products that makes the life of horses and riders easier and healthier. But more than that, though, EasyCare has been setting an example for horsemanship, horse welfare and public education. EasyCare has been involved in various equestrian disciplines  as sponsor, contributor, educator, blogger and their staff is competing in many disciplines. If we look for guidance, the staff of EasyCare has been setting a shining example in the whole equestrian world. 

The hoof care clinics EasyCare and I have been conducting for many years now, serve as an example on how to use hoof trimming methods and hoof protection that serve the horses well and additionally show the public that we all care about horse welfare. Taking a stand against horse abuse, cruelty, excesses in the show world and on the endurance circuit gives us all more credibility and we can show the world that we, the horse owners, hoof care practitioners and riders, are concerned and caring. Hoof care is holistic. In our clinics we always stressed that point. 

To proof my point, just read some of Daisy Bicking's blogs, or of Landreville Hoof Care, or one of my previous blogs about my clinics I am teaching every year. November this year, I will be traveling to Norway and Switzerland for all encompassing Hoof Care Clinics, where I will not only show and demonstrate EasyCare's broad spectrum of hoof protection but also lobby for the horse industry and the welfare of the horse throughout. Reports will be coming up.

Despite the dismal and somewhat sobering graphs I showed earlier, I remain optimistic that with joint effort we can reverse that declining trend and make a difference in the world.

From the Bootmeister

Christoph Schork

Global Endurance Training Center

Would You Like A Hoof Boot At 50% Off? EasyCare Bargain Bin Is Online And Live

Are you looking for hoof boots at 50% off?

EasyCare is the first company in the world to produce a commercially available hoof boot. We have been at it for 46 years and the majority of the terminology, technology and business systems in our market place have been established by EasyCare. Measuring charts, materials, boot terminology, fit kits and warranty procedures are a few of the many things that EasyCare has developed and are now being used by other boot makers.

Bargain Bin boots.  Only the best are cleaned up and sold at 50%

EasyCare's warranty procedures are some of the most aggressive in the business. We strive to make horses comfortable and their owners happy. The result of the warranty system is lightly used boots that can't be sold as new sit in the warehouse. These slightly used boots need a home and a hoof to protect. The Bargain Bin has been set up to list these high quality but slightly used boots at a 50% discount. All Bargain Boots are heat stamped with "BB" and are not covered by warranty. All sales are final. In addition to the slightly used boots, we will be also offering older boot models and discontinued models at 50% off.

The Bargain Bin has been set up to help our loyal customers and place our slightly used product. Quantities will be limited and will be updated weekly.

The Bargin Bin is now live. Check back weekly as your favorite boots will be listed here.  

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof boot for the barefoot horse.

 

 

Tevis Glue Ons

Submitted by Sossity Gargiulo of Wild Hearts Hoof Care.

The Western States Trail Ride, more popularly known as the Tevis Cup, probably needs no introduction. Being one of the top endurance competitions in the world, where 100 punishingly rugged miles are completed by qualified horses and their riders in a single 24 hour period.

For mere mortals such as myself, I can really only imagine the time, effort, money, blood, sweat and tears that go into preparing and qualifying a horse for an event like this. 

However this year, as a hoof care practitioner, we were able to do Tevis Easyboot Glue-On shells for the first time! In the last few years since we began working with endurance rider Kristine Hartman, we have glued on for many 50’s, a couple 100’s and even a few back to back rides where our skills were tested for 150 miles in a set! But when it came to gluing for Tevis, in previous years we happily handed off our freshly trimmed, barefoot clients to the amazing skills of Easy Care’s Team Elite. This year the task fell to us and I would be lying if I said it didn’t add a bit of pressure to our application!  

Cruising through, photo by Dominique Cognee

EasyCare has an impressive record with the Tevis Cup. (To read the stats check out Easyboot Success at the 2016 Tevis Cup- Statistics the Haters Won't Like!”) The Glue-On shell has served the horses well, providing cushion, traction and protection for 100 truly grueling miles of rocks, water crossings, roads, steep climbs, descents and MORE rocks!

For Kristine Hartman and her Arabian mare Tess (Count on Tessie Flyin’) we wanted to be certain her mare’s footwear helped her continue her streak of completions and excellent placings. As luck would have it, the day we were scheduled to apply our Glue-On’s for Tess, we got a visit from none other than farrier Daisy Bicking. Daisy was a member of the 2016 Tevis Team Elite. It was a group affair as farrier Chris Beggs from Australia and Sarah and Jon Smedley of Trim & Trainwas were also in attendance!

For endurance Glue-On prep, one of the steps we never miss is using the Hoof Buffy sand paper on the entire outer wall. This removes surface dirt and oils and the scratchy dry finish really helps grip the glue. We also put in shallow horizontal grooves into the wall with the side of the rasp, to provide additional grip – making the hoof wall groovy helps with glue traction as well.

We like to heat fit all of our Glue-On’s, and our Tevis-bound Tess was no exception. Heating the boot and helping it shape to the hoof wall allows excellent surface contact with no gapping, which helps with overall retention. For more information about heat fitting take a look at Pete Van Rossum's blog, "Applying Easyboots Using the Heat Fitting Method." We additionally recommend holding the heated boot against the hoof wall as it cools, feeling for any small gaps and pressing the shell into them - this really assists the boot shaping process. 

An extra step we do is to drill in small “glue grommets”, little circles around the wall area of the boot, into all 4 shells. These allow the glue to ooze through and over the shell upon its application to the hoof, adding several other anchor points for our best chances at retention.

Daisy assisted us with the Sikaflex 227 application, Team Elite style! The Sikaflex adhesive has an amazing 600% elongation memory, making it a wonderful stretchy soft cushion for use on the sole with the added benefit of it being adhesive. It is messy, slow setting business, so you use the much harder, quick setting Vettec Adhere for shoe retention on the walls, while the Sikaflex sole/frog application cures over about 24 hrs. Daisy’s application went perfectly, with Sikaflex oozing out the heel area in just the right amount that we knew the sole and frog were well cushioned.

A bead of Adhere along the top lip of the shoe helps form a strong seal to the boot, and finishing that with the Hoof Buffer really blends it so that there is no hard edge to snap of. It blends the material together for a smooth transition that looks nice but most importantly resists removal. We also use the buffer all around the toes to soften the breakover point. 

Cantering into the finish, photo by Dominique Cognee

This year’s Tevis included a new and difficult canyon, not to mention high humidity, hot temperatures, and even some rain!  Kristine reports that it was her hardest Tevis of her nine so far! That is impressive in itself, but some of you may recall a rider that broke her arm at a fall during Tevis last year. A woman who actually went on to complete the race in an amazing 25th place, that was none other than our own brave, (and yes, crazy) duo Kristine and Tess! Despite the sweltering, steamy weather and extra challenging canyons this year, Kristine and Tess rode a great ride, and finished safely and soundly in 24th place!  

We are grateful for the opportunity to do Glue-On’s for Tevis and are so proud to have been a part of this team and their success!