Did You Know that the Tevis Horse Race Ranks as One of the Top Ten Endurance Competitions in the World?

It's Tevis Cup Time!  We are two weeks away from the 63rd running of the most difficult 100-mile horse race in the world.  

Time Magazine compiled a list of the Top Ten Endurance Competitions in the World.  The list contains the 24 Hours of Le Mans, The Tour De France, Dakar Rally, Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, Cannon Ball Run, Four Deserts, The Tevis Cup, Marathon des Sables, La Ruta de los Conquistadores and the Vendee Globe.  

The Lead Pack at the 2012 Tevis Cup.

As you look through the list of ten competitions there are several that stick out and peak my interest.  The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race has always fascinated me because of the difficulty and the bond that the humans have with their dogs.  To travel 1,150 remote miles through difficult winter conditions as a team is hard to fathom.  The Tour De France is another mind bender.  Over 2,000 miles on a bike lasting roughly 20 days.  And on the Marathon des Sables six-day, 150-mile run across the blazing hot southern Moroccan Sahara, runners must carry they own food and water for the entire run. 

The 100 Mile Tevis Cup is the only equine event on the list and is the start of endurance events around the world.  Have you ever wondered why you receive a belt buckle for finishing a 100-mile run or a 100-mile mountain bike race?  The belt buckle awarded at the Tevis Cup has been adopted by events like the Western States 100 Mile Run and the Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race.   The Tevis Cup helped kick-start many of the events the endurance junkies dream to one day conquer.

My inner legs after the Tevis Cup.

Here's what Time Magazine had to say about the Tevis Cup:

A 24-hour, 100-mile horse ride from Lake Tahoe to Auburn, California, the Tevis Cup was first held in 1955. The important thing to know about this race is found on the Tevis Cup FAQ: "The weather conditions from year to year are mostly the same: HOT and DUSTY." One of the major difficulties here is not just getting your horse to the finish line, but making sure your horse is still "fit to continue" when it reaches the finish line. If you do so, no matter what place you come in, you get a silver belt buckle. That's right: 100 miles in 24 hours. For a belt buckle.

 

Lisa Ford climbs Cougar Rock.  Note the difficult footing.

For EasyCare the Tevis Cup has a special place.  The Tevis Cup is where we go to test our products.  The rocks, dust, distance, climbs and descents put extreme demands on the equine hoof and the hoof protection used.  It's just a matter of time before your horse steps on the perfect sharp rock and your ride is over.  Over the past 63 years roughly 50% of the riders that have started the race have finished.  The majority of the non finishes are because of lameness and the challenges caused by the rough trail.  

EasyCare started placing emphasis on the event in 2009 and used the event to test our urethane hoof protection.  My goal was to have our products excel at the toughest equine competition in the world. It's an event where you can't fake results, and where results trump marketing - it really tells you if something works. 

Easyboot Tread after the difficult 100-mile Tevis Trail.

EasyCare has found that not only have our unique urethane hoof protection products worked, but they have helped horses excel.   Since we started recording the stats at the Tevis Cup for horses wearing Easyboots back in the 2009 we have found the following:

1. From 2009 to 2017, horses wearing Easyboots finished 63.64% of the time. Horses not wearing Easyboots finished 50.77% of the time.

2. 6 out of the last 8 Tevis winning horses used Easyboots.

3. 7 of the last 8 Haggin Cup winning horses used Easyboots.  The Haggin Cup is the horse that is deemed the most fit to continue and able to do the 100 miles again. 

The 63rd annual Tevis Cup is two weeks away.  Everyone at EasyCare would like to wish all the riders and safe journey and to keep the urethane side down!  Enjoy the trip, enjoy the trail! 

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof protection for the barefoot horse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoeing The Hoof Or Shoeing The Horse?

By Christoph Schork of Global Endurance Training Center

Horses hooves do have "big shoes to fill," pun intended. Not so much because of previous great shoeing experiences but more so because of their responsibility to carry a heavy body through life's travels. Whether it's just hanging out as a backyard horse, competing on the track, dressage, versatility, trail riding, endurance racing or competing on demanding 100 mile races like Big Horn, Old Dominion, Biltmore or Tevis.

GE Blizzard of Oz, wearing the new EasyShoe Flex during the Old Pueblo Ride in Arizona, finishing in First Place and winning Best Condition

When talking about shoeing or booting horses, are we shoeing a hoof or are we shoeing the horse? Now, what does that question entail? In the definition of a farrier's job description, he or she is engaging in 'horse shoeing.' Nobody refers to a farrier as a 'hoof shoer.' For the sake of an argument, let's look at the term 'hoof shoeing' first.

Shoeing a hoof means that we are looking specifically at a hoof, trimming it according to our parameters and then booting or shoeing that particular hoof. We might be looking at live sole, medial and lateral balance, point of rotation and midpoint balance. We are evaluating and trimming and shoeing a hoof!

When trimming and shoeing a horse, I follow an holistic approach to hoof care. First I evaluate the conformation and posture of the horse, then I consider the weight and the alignment.

As an example of how we trim and shoe to provide support for the whole horse, not just a single hoof, we'll look at the horse below.

This image shows an untrimmed hoof. We can observe that the hoof is pretty symmetrical in appearance from the dorsal view point. If we draw a red line through the center of the fetlock we can see that both halves of the hoof are equal in width.

Here's a similar observation on a horse with a trimmed hoof.

In both cases the horse's body is supported by the hoof. The whole hoof is equally loaded and receiving equal ground pressure.

In the next case, however, the hoof cannot fulfill its job of properly supporting the horses weight. The plum line drawn from the center of the canon bone does not divide the hoof capsule in equal halves. Notice how it's offset to one side. The lateral half of this front right hoof is quite a bit wider compared to the medial half. (Blue horizontal line vs green line.)

My next question is how can I mitigate that conformation fault and center that hoof better under his leg? For starters, when trimming, I'll rasp the lateral wall a little more and the medial wall somewhat less, to try and move the hoof more underneath the bone column. 

Look at the two blue vertical guide lines coming up from the supporting area of the sole. The leg is now more centered over the sole. I shifted the support area medially.

When shoeing or applying hoof protection to this hoof EasyCare provides the tools to center the hoofs ground bearing surface even more under the leg. The new EasyShoe Flex is the perfect shoe to help horses with asymmetrical hooves.

Here's how the Flex can be used to help center the hoof under the limb.

In this photo, I moved the Flex more to the medial side (see the red arrow), to center the bone column over the supporting surface.

The weight baring surface of the Flex is now centered under the red plum line, and both lateral and medial (yellow lines), are equidistant between the two blue vertical guide lines again. 

The protruding edge, red arrow, can easily get beveled off so a horse would be less likely to step on it and pull the shoe off.

With a grinder or even a rasp the shoe can get easily modified. The spring steel insert can also get rasped without any problems. 

Stay tuned, because I'll be sharing more information on the Flex. You'll learn how easy it is to nail on the Flex, get some DOs and DONT's, and see my test results on their performance during long and hard endurance races up to 100 miles in length. I'll also be including the Flex Light, the version without the spring steel core.

In the photo below, the Flex Light, in a size 3, is shown on top. It comes with the heart bar for frog support. Below the Light is the Flex Open Heel with spring steel core, also in a size 3. The steel inside gives it enough rigidity so that a heart bar isn't necessary. It's also available in a heart bar version.

The Flex is opening a lot of new doors for the riders, farriers and trimmers alike. 

From the Bootmeister
Christoph Schork

www.globalendurance.com

5 Reasons Why the Easyboot Glove Soft is Outperforming Expectations

By Garrett Ford, President of EasyCare Inc.

The Glove Soft has been a challenge to keep in stock!

The Easyboot Glove Soft was added into the EasyCare line up of hoof boots in early 2018.  It's been selling very well and exceeding our forecasts.  Several sizes have sold out and we are working hard to get more in stock for the busy summer months.  

The Glove history goes back to 2009 with the launch of the Easyboot Glove. We've made a number of improvements over the years, and while people have been very happy with it, the rubber gaiter on the 2016 model makes it a bit more challenging to install. This feedback, along with other comments from our valued customers, resulted in the design and launch of the Glove Soft. 

The Glove line has always been a favorite. You can see why in the video below. It shows the original Glove in action during a very difficult 50-mile race. Even in terrible, muddy conditions down slipper terrain, the boots stayed on with no problems. Notice the Glove's low profile and snug fit that allows the horse to be the athlete it is. The horse went on to finish 1st and receive Best Condition. (If you watch the video to the end, you'll notice I took a tumble, but kept on filming!)

 

Here's a quick list of what we were trying to achieve with the Easyboot Glove Soft and the reasons horse owners like the boot so much.  

1.  The Easyboot Glove line is the closest fitting hoof boot line. It doesn't add bulk and width to the hoof, allowing the horse to be athletic and nimble.  

2.  The ability to fold the gaiter back all the way. This achieves a very easy installation of the hoof boot. When the gaiter is folded backward it's quick and easy to slip over a hoof and get a tight fit.  The gaiter is then rotated up and fits around the pastern.  

3.  Wider hook and loop make for a better hold and closure. We have beefed up the hoof and loop for a more secure fit. Now it's 1.5 inches wide.  

4.  Longer straps allow the boot to fit more pastern circumferences.   The overlap system and longer straps allow the gaiter to fit both large bone and finer bone pasterns.  

5.  The Glove Soft comes in both regular and wide sizes.  The range has 20 different sizes to fit most horses.

We appreciate your feedback on the Glove line and are excited that the Easyboot Glove Soft is part of our 2018 product range.  We are working hard to prevent back orders, so please be patient.

Enjoy your summer riding.

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof protection for the barefoot horse.

 

 

Your Glue-On Shopping List

By EasyCare Product Specialist, Regan Roman

As an EasyCare Product Specialist, people ask me all the time what items they need to get started in the world of Glue-Ons. I decided to compile a list with everything you will need to get started, why you need them and a few helpful tips. Keep in mind that the best tool of all is a qualified Hoof Care Practitioner who is experienced in gluing. Although not necessary in every case, a glue-on expert is the best way to go.

First off, we always recommend ordering an Easycare Fit Kit before getting started. It will help you to determine the proper size EasyShoe for your horse. You'll receive three different sized shoes in the EasyShoe of your choice - one in the size you specify, one a size larger, and one a size smaller. And it works like a rental program! You can make sure the shoe fits before making a purchase!

 

When you're finally ready to order your pair of EasyShoes, here's a list of the additional items you'll want to include in your shopping cart:

Items Needed

*Note: Items without links are not sold by EasyCare.

 

Optional Items

  • Moisture meter
    For checking the moisture in the hoof. You want it to be at 0%.
  • Hoof Buffy
    The hoof buffy cleans up the hoof to prepare it for the gluing, just like exfoliating before shaving your legs.
  • Buffy sleeves 10 pack
    The buffy is made with a 60, 80 or 100 grit sand paper which should be replaced after every few uses.
  • Buffy Bladder
    This piece gives shape to the Buffy sleeve allowing the sand paper to scuff up the hoof wall.
  • Easyboot Zip
    The Zip is designed to keep your horse hoof clean before gluing or bandaging.
  • Spacer
    For applying the EasyShoe Performance.

For more information about glue-ons and gluing, watch our YouTube videos. And to find a Hoof Care Practitioner near you, check out our website Dealer Locator.

 


 

Glue-On Composite Shoes Help the Horse & Build Bridges

By Daisy Bicking of Daisy Haven Farm

In the past, I’ve written about the importance of finding common ground with each other. Whether you call yourself a farrier, barefoot trimmer, equine podiatrist or hoof care provider, it doesn't matter because we're all responsible for the same thing:

The care and soundness of the horse’s foot.

I’ve written about how we all have beliefs about what we do with the horse’s foot along the lines of religious conviction. (See blog "One Hoof Church, All Religions") We tend to think in terms of Good and Bad, Right and Wrong. However, I believe we are more than that. I believe that what we can learn from each other about helping a horse overcomes anything that could divide us.

I get to travel all over the world teaching and helping others be successful using glue-on composite shoes like the EasyShoe (Performance, NG, Sport, Compete, and new Flex) Easyboot Glue-On, Easyboot LC, and Easyboot Flip Flop. The diversity of practitioners attending these clinics amazes me: farrier, trimmer, podiatrist and hoof care provider.  The glue-on composite shoe clinics attract individuals from a variety of backgrounds and training styles who come together in one place to learn how to help the horse. There are very few places where such a strongly opinionated group of people can come learn together and dare I say, even learn from each other!

Glue-on composite shoes create a common ground that bridges the differences between us, and opens the door to opportunities to help each other help horses more effectively. They're a tool that accommodates not only differences in trim style, and differences in believe about shoe placement and fit, but they cross international differences of language and culture. Regardless of a person's background or location, glue-ons are a tool that anyone can successfully use to help the horse.

I recently traveled to Norway and was excited to see many diverse practitioners come together again.  We had participants who called themselves farriers, blacksmiths, and natural balance farriers.  We also had barefoot trimmers from multiple schools of training, and several veterinarians.   Everyone was open-minded to new ideas and respected each other.

We had fun, learned from each other, and helped a number of horses in the process. 

At this clinic in particular we talked a lot about the Four Stages of Learning.

Many of us operate in the first stage of learning, Unconscious Incompetence, meaning you don't know what you don't know.  When you realize you need to learn more, you get to the second stage of learning, Conscious Incompetence, which is a very uncomfortable place to be but often motivates you to obtain more education, like coming to a hoof clinic.  Then you learn more, and get to Stage 3, Conscious Competence, meaning you can use a new skill but with concentration and effort.  Then finally when you've practiced enough, and have proficiency at the task you get to the fourth stage of learning, Unconscious Competence, meaning you can do something competently without conscious thought.  

In order for such a diverse group of practitioners to get together, often the participants have to be willing to live in Stage 2, a place of Conscious Incompetence, in front of their peers, many from opposing philosophies.  It takes a great deal of mental and emotional toughness to put yourself in that place.  The group from Norway excelled at being open-minded and supported each other by sharing new ideas without judgment.  They each took away new information and skills to practice, which moved them to Stage 3, Conscious Competence.

I am amazingly proud to share a tool that can create common ground among diverse practitioners. There is so much to gain from coming together and learning from each other, I am grateful that glue-on composite shoes can create a platform for sharing as well as be a valuable tool to help the horse.  

 

For more information on Daisy Haven Farm and Glue-on Composite Shoe clinics please see:
www.DaisyHavenFarm.com
www.IntegrativeHoofSchool.com
 

 

The EasyShoe Flex is shipping now. What do you need to know?

The EasyShoe Flex horse shoe line is finally here! In the warehouse and shipping now.  

Curtis Burns and I have worked many hours on this shoe and are very happy with the final result. It has a long wearing, shock absorbing urethane tread with a flexible spring steel core. Both Curtis and I believe the EasyShoe Flex line will help many horses and fills a niche in the industry. Another arrow in the quiver. 

What's different about this urethane shoe? 

The biggest challenge with other urethane shoes is stability. Urethane shoes without an internal nail plate have a tendency to both "cup" and have nail clinches loosen with time. Adding a solid steel core solves the nail issue but does not allow hoof mechanism. We believe we have solved both of the urethane challenges by adding a spring steel core. The spring steel core promotes hoof mechanism and allows a solid anchor for nail clinching. In addition, the shape of the spring steel core solves the cupping and sole pressure problems that plague many other urethane shoe designs.  

A Nail-on urethane/steel hybrid that promotes hoof mechanism.

 

Watch the shoe flex under load. Hoof mechanism with each foot fall.  

What our EasyCare dealers and horse owners need to know:

1.  We have inventory in our warehouse of all styles and are shipping now. Dealers and consumers can place orders here.

2.  There are 4 styles. EasyShoe Flex Open Heel, EasyShoe Flex Heart Bar, EasyShoe Flex Full Heart Bar and EasyShoe Flex Light. The open heel, heart bar and full heart bar are available with toe clips or side clips.

3.  All sizes and styles are the same price except for the EasyShoe Flex Light. The Flex Light is a lower price point.  

Open nail slots and clear urethane provide accurate nail placement.

 

The four biggest take home messages for the farrier:

1.  The EasyShoe is very easy to apply. Any farrier can do it. The EasyShoe Flex line is not shaped with an anvil, the shoe is shaped by removing material with a belt sander or band saw. Watch Tim Cable apply the shoe in the video below.  

 

2.  Nails can be driven through the clear urethane window or holes can be pre-drilled. If the holes are pre-drilled, nailing is very accurate and no different that other nail on applications. The clear urethane material make the white line easy to see.  

3.  Wear is very great! Most people can expect a reset. The urethane is very hard wearing and the wide web makes for extended longevity.  

4.  It's easy to fit both front and back feet with the same pattern. Simply trace and remove material to match the shape of the hoof. The open nail slots provide plenty of adjustment after material is removed for accurate nail placement.

 

We hope your horses enjoy the new design. It's been a fun project that both Curtis and myself believe fills a niche in the equestrian industry.

 

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof protection for the barefoot horse.

 

 

 

 

 

How Barefoot and Booting is Being Used in the Dressage Arena

Submitted by Sossity Gargiulo of Wild Hearts Hoof Care

When Shannon Peters contacted me over 6 years ago about one of her Warmbloods in her dressage stables, she knew that a barefoot or booted approach could help. She introduced me to her 3-year-old Dutch Warmblood,with the amazing name of Disco Inferno. Disco had just been imported from Europe and Shannon was concerned that he was already displaying a toe first landing. After discussing his situation and watching him trot back and forth on hard ground, we noted that overall, he wasn’t using his heel properly.

We agreed to pull his shoes and try our best to get a better landing with Comfort Pads and Easyboot Glove boots. That first day we really only got a flatter landing, but our approach is always to strive for positive change and any improvement is improvement. As each step he took became more comfortable he began to load his foot correctly. It was a positive change for him and over time he developed a beautiful and confident stride.

Left photo taken immediately after shoe removal. Right photo demonstrates improvements after only 4 months.

For the first few years Shannon showed Disco barefoot while continuing to train him either barefoot or in Easyboot Gloves. For dressage fans, you may remember a photo of Disco in the February 2013 article in Dressage Today about Shannon taking her horses barefoot. She takes her horses on the trails weekly to keep their minds and bodies fresh and uses Gloves for protection from the hard ground of Del Mar, California. In the last year Shannon felt that Disco was ready to begin showing in the Concours de Dressage International (CDI), an international dressage event recognized by the world governing body of equestrian sports, the Federation Equestrian International (FEI). CDI events require that you present your horse in a veterinary soundness check, aka “the jog.”  The horse is trotted on hard ground on straight lines and hoof boots are not permitted.  They are also not permitted for any dressage competition.   

Disco was shown a couple of times in modified Easyboot Glue-Ons but, he seemed to really find his groove in the Easyboot Love Child. Disco has gorgeous frogs and his feet are a nice overall shape, but he has never grown much sole. Shannon and I were so excited to see the positive changes he made with a couple of cycles in the flexible Love Child showing that beautiful confidence in his landings and improved sole depth! 

In April, Shannon showed him in his first Intermediare I CDI at the prestigious Del Mar National Horse Show. They did beautifully, scoring in the upper 60’s.  Disco even showed off his Grand Prix skills, which unfortunately don’t earn any extra points. Shannon is looking forward to making their official Grand Prix debut this fall.

We are so excited to be a little part of the team for this dancing duo! 

Sharing EasyCare Products at a Local Clinic Helped Grow My Business Network

Submitted by Jon Smedley of Trim and Train

About six months ago, our local farrier supply store asked me to do a clinic for glue on shoes. In the past when the shop owner held Saturday clinics usually only five to seven people showed up. On that particular Saturday, we ended up having 57 attendees. 

In an effort to build on that success, Canoga Farrier Supply planned an Open House for vendors and product distributors to show off their products and perform demonstrations. They’re located in the North East Corner of Los Angeles County. It’s considered the local shop for farriers from LA Equestrian Center, Santa Anita Race Track, Endurance teams in the Valley and Malibu, Jumping and Dressage barns in LA and Ventura as well as many other farriers in the Southern California Area.

Of course, they wanted EasyCare there to demonstrate gluing techniques!

The morning of the Open House was a rare drizzly day in Southern California.

We set up and answered tons of questions on a couple of EasyCare’s newest products, including the Stratus, with its customizable urethane pad, and the EasyShoe Flex urethane shoe. Many of the folks that were interested were from other tables. They were there to show off their products but wanted to learn about the new EasyCare products!

I did a demonstration for gluing on the Easyboot Glue-On shell and the EasyShoe. This is always a lot of fun for me. I often say to myself when I’m done with the demo, “Wow, that was easy,” and then I look at the crowd and I see the same thought in their eyes, “Wow, that’s easy!” The attendance surpassed the initial clinic with over 75 hoof care professionals present.

Events at your local farrier supply store, tack store, or even veterinary clinic can be a great way to learn, share and build your network. 

Tips on Applying a Power Strap to the Easyboot Glove

Submitted by EasyCare Product Specialist, Jordan Junkermann

Our Easyboot Gloves are a form fitting, versatile boot that allow high performance riders to perform at the level they want without adding weight or bulkiness to the barefoot hoof. The Glove has the capacity to be used for long distances and frequent riding, which means they also do well with weekend riders, parades, and with driving horses.

To truly benefit horse and rider, this boot requires a snug fit, and while some hooves glide into the boot like Cinderella into her glass slippers, others have a shape that makes for a challenging fit. For a more rounded hoof shape, you’ll find that the Glove comes in larger widths.This may give you the perfect fit. But, if the hoof is narrow for its length, there’s a solution to snug up the fit - the Easyboot Power Strap. It cinches the boot like a belt.

Here are some tips on applying the Power Strap

The two best methods for inserting holes where the Strap will connect to the boot are a leather punch or a wood burning tool. Keep in mind that the holes need to big enough to accommodate a T-nut, screw and washer.  

1. Leather Hole Punch

One option is to use a leather hole punch and punch on the indicated areas of the front of the boot and power strap. In the method below, we used a different kind of punch that works best when it’s sharp. The tools you will need for this method include: a wooden block, a nail to start the puncture, a punch, and a hammer. First, make a small hole on the boot with the nail and hammer, using the wooden block as a brace on the inside to give you something solid to steady the punch. Next, hammer a hole on the other size of the boot with the punch and hammer, again using the wooden block as a brace. 

Using a nail can start a hole in the desired area

 

Using this type of punch requires a hammer.

2. Wood Burning Tool

Another method suggested by one of our Product Specialists is to use a wood burning tool. It can be purchased for around $16, and it’s quick, requires less strength and creates a perfect hole for the hardware to sit in.

Start by heating up the wood burning tool. It’s a good idea to have a rag handy, because you’ll want to periodically clean the melted rubber off of the tip of the tool to reduce excess smoke.

 

We tried a couple different tips but found a wide one to be useful. Make sure to screw it in before you heat up the tool. 

 

Start with the base of the boot. Make your holes where indicated on the front of the boot. Don't be afraid to make it a little bit bigger than the tip.

 

Clean up any excess rubber at the back end or any that builds up in the front. This excess could get in the way of threading the screw onto the T-nut.

 

Create the same holes on the Power Strap using the markings on the back of the Strap as guides.

 

Make sure to check that your screw will fit into the holes you have made.


 

 

Trim the ends of the Power Strap by cutting the line above the correct number on the Power Strap that matches the size boot you have.

 

Once the T-nut is seated in the back of the boot, it only takes a minute to line up the Power Strap hole and tighten it down with the screw and washer. 

 

To make it easier to line up the second hole, use a pair of locking pliers as a clamp to hold the boot, Power Strap and hardware in place.

 

Placing the second side screw is easy with the locking pliers.

 

The Power Strap in place!

 

Attaching the Power Strap to the Glove can be simple and should provide the snug fit needed to enjoy this popular boot.

Under Pressure – Dealing with an Abscess (Part Two)

Submitted by EasyCare Product Specialist, Kelsey Lobato

After discovering an abscess and finding out the cause, start treatment and possibly a prevention program. The treatment program will depend on the type of abscess your horse has and what your vet and farrier have determined. It's important to remember that each approach to treating an abscess is unique and varies from others.

Here is my experience.

My first step in treating a hoof abscess is to gather supplies and medications. This way it's handy in the barn aisle or stall. 

  1. A bucket
  2. An Easyboot Soaker
  3. Epsom salt and Betadine
  4. Epsom salt poultice (if you cannot soak)
  5. Hydrogen peroxide
  6. A syringe
  7. Hoof pick
  8. Duct tape
  9. Gauze
  10. Vet wrap
  11. Easyboot Trail or Easyboot Cloud
  12. Gold Bond Powder

Note: If your vet has prescribed antibiotics and Bute, follow your doctor's instructions as long as the abscess has blown and you are seeing drainage. 

After gathering all your supplies, clean the hoof gently using a hoof pick and squirt hydrogen peroxide in the infected area. Make sure the pus and debris is cleaned out thoroughly for soaking. Next, place the Soaker boot on your horse and fill the boot with Epsom salt, betadine and hot water. Soak the hoof for about 10-15 minutes once a day for 3-4 days. If you can't soak the horses foot, use an Epsom salt poultice. Put a generous amount around the abscess/hoof, wrap and then leave on for 24 hours. Repeat for 3-4 days.

Once you have soaked the hoof, keep the hoof dry and clean. For my horse Summer Flame, I also packed the hoof with betadine/Epsom salt soaked gauze. I wrapped it with duct tape and vet wrap for 3 days until I could put her out with the other horses in boots.

Photo: Summer Flame in her makeshift boot

Keep the hoof clean, packed, and bandaged for several days, depending on how long it takes for the lameness to disappear. If the infection is deep in the hoof, the process of eliminating the infection and relieving the horse of pain will take longer.

In Summer Flame’s case, because the abscess was slow to heal and she still had swelling, I stopped wrapping her hoof and put her in the Easyboot Trails with medicated padding. I also continued with her prescribed antibiotics. She did very well turned out 24/7 in the boots. I checked them once a day to make sure they were staying on and not causing additional issues. She wore them for another week until the vet gave the "okay" for them to come off.

Note: if you leave the boots on for long periods of time, add Gold Bond Powder or a copper sulfate mix to prevent bacteria growth.

Photo: Summer Flame in the Trail boot

Here are the preventative measures I follow:

  • Maintain a regular farrier schedule
  • Feed a quality hoof supplement
  • Clean the hoof daily (If I can't get to the barn, I clean the hoof every two days)

In addition, keeping your pastures and paddocks clean as well as not over bathing your horse should reduce the risk of abscess development. If you have rocks in your paddock, removing them can help keep your horse from a stone bruise, which can lead to an abscess.

No matter how much you take preemptive steps to ensure no abscesses, there still might be a day when one does appear. Stay calm and act promptly in consulting your veterinarian and farrier. Be prepared and have the provisions you will need on hand to treat the problem.

 

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Solutions For A Hoof Abscess

Treating an Abscess Using the Easyboot Rx