Learning, Adapting and Growing.

Submitted by Steve Foxworth, President of the E.L.P.O.

Equine hoof care: an industry with great tradition, experience, and information that has been passed down from generation to generation; from Father to Son, from Grandfather to Grandson, and, in some cases, Great Grandfather to Great Grandson with one important mission: the comfort of horses. 

It amazes me that, for centuries, horses have played such important roles in human lives. The role today that horses play is definitely different than the role they've played in the past. Horses used to be more of a tool for transportation or that of a tractor or truck and even used as weapons for war. Today, they are more often used for pleasure, sport, or companionship. Regardless whether a horse is used as a tool or as a companion or both, the importance of hoof care is more evident now than ever. A horse’s ability to learn, adapt, and change is truly incredible. Horses do so many different things with little to no objection i.e. racing, dressage, jumping, cross country, vaulting, roping, barrel racing, bulldogging, reining, cutting, endurance, competitive trail, mounted shooting, crowd control, driving etc. and on multiple different surfaces (dirt, clay, rock, gravel, sand, artificial surfaces, grass, asphalt, concrete) and in wet and dry environments. No matter what we come up with the horse is willing to TRY!

As hoof care providers, it is beneficial if we can be more like the horses in our ability to adapt and change. Our mindset as hoof care providers is key in achieving this. Without putting “right” and “wrong” or “good” and “bad” but instead using an observation of what the horse wants or responds favorably to can only help these amazing animals continue to TRY. It is not necessarily what we are using as a tool to care for them (metal, wood, or composite shoes that are nailed, screwed, strapped or glued) or leaving them barefoot, but the continued education of how all of these tools work, and then the practice in becoming proficient with them. Understanding it is a journey, not a destination, and allows us to learn, adapt and grow just like the horse.

The E.L.P.O. (Equine Lameness Prevention Organization) works toward such a journey. The organization’s goal is to question, monitor, and improve upon practices regarding hoof care. With great respect for tradition and the centuries of information that have been passed down, the members of the E.L.P.O. also strive to be like the horse with a willingness to learn, adapt and grow. With the help of Daisy Bicking and Garrett Ford over the last 3 to 4 years, the E.L.P.O. has seen the importance and the benefits of glue-on composite shoes. In 2016, the E.L.P.O. held the first CFGP (Certified Farrier Glue Practitioner) exams in Pennsylvania. With Daisy as a lead in designing, instructing, and assessing this exam, farriers have a strong base in which they can build from. The many different things that can be accomplished both with urethane and acrylic glues and the innovation of a multitude of shoe possibilities is proving to be very beneficial.

For the last 2 years, one of the Board of Directors of the E.L.P.O., Matt Staples, has been asking for this certification to be brought to the United Kingdom. In March of this year, Daisy and I led a glue course and CFGP exam in conjunction with a Level 5 Examiner/Instructor course in the U.K.. Instructors and examiners from the U.K., France, Holland and the U.S. came together to learn. Participants sat through 6 hours of lectures and discussion ranging from leadership and communication, to glue types, composite shoes and applications. Participants evaluated and graded several cadaver feet using the E.L.P.O. Hoof Evaluation Protocol. The frog, heels, bars, and toes all get assessed with a 0-5 scale (0 meaning non-distorted and 5 being the greatest distortion) while taking turns assessing each other as well. Cadaver feet were trimmed using hoof mapping as a guide along with what was assessed in the Hoof Evaluation Protocol. Daisy then did a demonstration on glue prep on the foot with explaining what we understand today as best practice including moisture control, dirt and debris, scuffing, feathering and common things that could cause glue failure. Participants were then able go through the process on multiple cadaver feet.  At the end of the second day, five instructors who had previous glue experience and were prepared to take the practical exam completed it and passed. Having these instructors pass this exam is paving the way to start having CFGP qualifications in the U.K. and Europe.

Seeing the willingness to learn and continue gathering information from these farriers where tradition runs as deep as any place in the world, was extremely rewarding. These farriers are adding to an already enormous amount of information of hoof care. This group of practitioners are not making things “right” or “wrong”, they are looking to learn and become proficient at hoof care so that they can service horses in a manner that horses have served humans for centuries with a want to learn, adapt and grow.

Many thanks to Garrett Ford and EasyCare as you continue to donate material so that many more horses and people can benefit from an education of the possibilities of glue-on composite shoes. Another thank you to Red Horse Products who also sponsored the course and provide a line of products to help maintain healthy hooves.

Thinking Glue - Outside the Box of Equine Podiatry

Submitted by Chris Niclas CJF, CLS and owner of Chris’ Farrier Service Inc.

There have been many changes in the hoof-care industry over the last 25 years. One of the changes I have come to appreciate is the use of adhesives and glue-on shoes. From being intimidated by the failures of using glue in the beginning, to becoming comfortable using it in my daily practice, it has been a journey. As a teenager I became interested in hoof-care out of necessity. Almost 25 years later, I still have a passion for the horse and am driven to continue learning new skills as a farrier. 

I met Mark Plumlee, owner and instructor of Mission Farrier School, at an International hoof-care clinic he hosted in the late 1990’s. Mark is a Certified Journeyman Farrier, a Registered Journeyman Farrier, and a Certified Lameness Specialist. Knowing that Mark has been on the leading edge of farrier science, when it comes to farrier education, I approached him last fall and asked if I could attend Mission Farrier School. After 20 years as a professional farrier, I was excited to learn how much information is available in both the art and science of hoof-care. 

During my time at MFS, Mark asked me if I would be willing to partner with his school to go deeper into the emerging market of gluing on shoes in a way that was meaningful for the horse. Since I am currently working on my own certifications for becoming an Instructor and Examiner for the Equine Lameness Prevention Organization (ELPO), I realized this would be a good opportunity for me to thoroughly investigate the Glue-On protocol, as part of my “homework” for the ELPO certification. 

In teaching a glue clinic, I knew I needed to investigate and confirm what the general Glue-On protocol was currently. So last November, after attending a level 5 clinic with the ELPO in Loveland, CO, I drove down to Durango, CO and had the privilege of spending a day with Garrett Ford, CEO of EasyCare Inc. We spent most of the day gluing on shoes, as well as sharing our ideas, inventions, and prototypes. Becoming familiar with using glue and synthetic shoes has given me multiple options to protect and support the equine foot in both performance and therapeutic applications.

I knew I did not want to work with cadaver feet when teaching the glue clinic at Mission Farrier School. I also wanted an easy and simple way students could learn to work with the glue without the added stress of being under a horse. This led me to create a wooden foot that attached to a hoof stand and simulated the working positions needed to both glue on a shoe and remove it, since both are important when working with a glue-on equine clientele.

Garrett Ford and EasyCare Inc. were very generous in donating shoes and glue for the clinic. Additionally, Larkin Greene the Western Regional Sales Manager for Vettec, also donated glue and came up from California to attend the clinic. Larkin was instrumental in sharing his knowledge of chemistry and the structures of how the different adhesives work. His 35 years of experience gave us all many valuable tips in using glue successfully.

The Glue clinic was attended by farriers and students from across the United States. The state that were represented included Alaska, Washington, California, Colorado, Montana, North Carolina, Massachusetts and even the Netherlands. Everyone at the clinic had an opportunity to glue on 3 different shoes the EasyShoe Performance N/G, EasyBoot Glue-On and the EasyShoe Sport.

After each gluing exercise we would gather as a group and the class would share what they learned. This created a positive learning environment and allowed everyone to learn from others mistakes and successes. For most of the people attending the clinic, this was their first experience using glue. The learning curve often leaves a person discouraged or overwhelmed, which can lead to not using adhesives as a tool in their trade. My goal was to teach the steps of how to clean and dry the foot, so it is prepared for the process of gluing on a shoe and is the key to a successful gluing job. Providing a hands-on experience, students were able to learn firsthand what it looked like if they applied too much or too little glue. Being able to practice both gluing on a shoe and taking it off multiple times, created an environment where each participant could gain confidence in the process.

It is important to remember that each horse is an individual and each foot may have its own special needs. Throughout the two days there were brain puzzles on a dry erase board that challenged all attending to think outside the box. This became an exercise to stretch our minds in creativity and problem solving. For the third project everyone was able to create a problem and a solution for their wooden horse's foot. I really enjoyed watching how creative each team was at putting into practice “thinking outside the box”. Some teams made hoof wall extensions, others created a shoe with a hospital plate that could be glued on and others created ways of doing a hoof wall repair. At the end of the day I did a live demonstration putting all the pieces into practice on a special needs horse.

If you are curious and find yourself inspired to explore the world of adhesives and all the possibilities with gluing on a shoe, checkout the webinars that EasyCare has put together. They are well worth taking the time to watch and study.

Mission Farrier School has been teaching leading edge farrier science for 25 years, and offers a quality Farrier education. Most of their students come with little to no horseshoeing experience, but occasionally you’ll find a few seasoned professionals like myself learning the new science and advancing our own skills, right along-side the newbies.

The Equine Lameness Prevention Organization offers clinics and classes throughout the year teaching Hoof Mapping, proper Barefoot Trimming and advanced classes for becoming a Certified Lameness Specialist or Certified Farrier Glue Practitioner.

Vettec has countless clinics throughout the year and many helpful webinars and videos available on the internet. Take the time to check them out.

If anyone wants to practice on their own with a wooden horse hoof adapted to fit a hoof jack, mine will be available for sale by special order. I have found the horse is the best teacher of all. At the end of each day, it is the opinion of the horse that guides us to becoming the best hoof care providers we can be.

A big thank you to Mark & Karen Plumlee, Steve Foxworth, Garrett Ford, Larkin Greene, James Klund and my wife Kristi in helping and equipping me to help others.

 

In Love With The Love Child

When working with glue and composite shoes, there are a variety of factors that impact which shoe you might choose. Some of those factors include the horse's job, the type of support/mechanics/protection/traction the horse needs, and more. When setting yourself up for success, there's also a direct relationship between the experience of the person applying the shoes and the amount of glue surface area the shoe offers. The higher the demands on the foot and shoe the more detailed your application needs to be and more glue surface area the better in many cases for added insurance.  

I was intrigued when EasyCare announced trials available for a new shoe, fondly called the Love Child. With so many glue-on composites shoes available, the largest variety of shoe design and application options already coming from EasyCare, I wondered what the Love Child would have to offer that was unique. The Love Child comes from the union of two already fabulous products, the EasyBoot Glue-on and the EasyShoe Performance. The Love Child combines the tread of the Performance with a modified cuff from the Glove Glue-on. Additionally, a full pad was added in the bottom of the Love Child. This pad is softer than the bottom of the Glove Glue-on which allows for more flexibility in the heels. I immediately thought of several horses this hybrid boot/shoe could help, and applied to be a tester.  

Over the last several months I've been able to apply the Love Child to two different horses in two very different situations playing with both acrylic and urethane glues with tremendous success. This first horse is a teenage hunter/jumper thoroughbred who has had chronic lameness in both the front and hind end. He does very well in EasyShoe Performance or Performance N/G on the front, but we've had difficulty getting EasyShoes on the hind feet because he cannot hold his legs up for very long and going weight-bearing in our application process in the past has been difficult.  

The Love Child offered us an excellent option for hoof protection with a greater chance of success. Here are his hind feet before Love Child application, note how badly he wears his toes due to his hind end discomfort.

The Love Child fit his hind feet perfectly.

His feet were prepped well for glue by scuffing and drying all glue surface areas, in this case the wall, from heel to heel. Fungidye is applied in the quarters to prevent infection growing in a bit of wall separation present, then Artimud was applied to the sole side of the foot to prevent fungus and bacteria from growing before next trim/shoeing.

Finally dental impression material was applied to provide sole support, and to help prevent debris from going up under the shoe.   

The Love Child was glued on with acrylic glue, cleaned up and had a final layer of super glue applied over top. They have been on for four weeks and the horse is quite comfortable and sound, schooling low level dressage four-five days/week. We're expecting the shoes will provide him with sole support and protection, as well and prevent the worst of the toe wear over time.  

Here is the Love Child applied to the second horse, an endurance horse. We were able to use urethane glue on the left at the first application, and acrylic glue on the right for the second application. Both glue applications kept the horse comfortable and performed well. There was no reason for the change beyond curiosity of application differences between the two. Both glues worked quite well. We followed the same application details as specified above for each set of shoes, including antimicrobials, dental impression material, and hoof prep protocol.  

This is a horse who is a chronic shoe puller and needs a weight bearing application for glue on work. The Love Child is an excellent shoe for this horse because the large amount of glue surface area helps ensure shoe retention, and with the complete toe cuff, is easy to apply in a weight bearing method. This first set stayed on for seven weeks with no issue even though the horse lives in a wet environment with a lot of mud and rocks. The glue bonds were strong, the shoe expanded at the back as the foot grew, and dental impression material stayed in all but the very back.  

When they were removed for the second application they came off cleanly, with no wall degradation. The shoe had some mud on the inside, but no debris. And the frog, bars and sole cleaned up with no bacteria or fungus present. The slight sole bruising evident in the photo here was on all four feet, even though the fronts are shod and the hinds are barefoot. He's a very sensitive horse.  

Overall we've been very impressed with the performance and ease of application of the Love Child. I definitely see a place for this shoe as a tool to help horses in my practice. Thank you EasyCare!  

For more information on Daisy Haven Farm, Inc. please see www.IntegrativeHoofSchool.com
 

Endurance And EasyCare

The sport of endurance riding is only a small segment of all equestrian sports nationally and worldwide. Maybe 5% of all equestrians engage in endurance. Attending the AERC Annual Convention, one gets the feeling that endurance riders are the center of the horse world. This year's AERC Convention was held in Dallas, Texas.

New AERC officers are being sworn in during the general session at the convention.

Endurance riders from the country and abroad came together for two days of seminars, various board and committee meetings and a trade show that gave participants a glimpse of new products on the market and also the opportunity to buy equestrian products, from EasyCare hoof boots to Vettec glues and various saddles. Specialized Saddles was well represented. EasyCare, Inc. is a Platinum Sponsor of AERC and the Official Hoof Boot Company of AERC.

In the photo above, Larkin Greene from Vettec Company is explaining gluing Easyboot shells on a model hoof during the trade show.

David Kaden and Tracy Webb, owners of Specialized Saddles, are presenting the Rookie Award to the Rookie of the Year. Specialized Saddles made and donated the saddle to the Rookie with the highest achieved mileage in 2016.

After the awards banquet, national awards achieved during the 2016 season were presented for the winners of various categories. I had a very successful year competing mostly on mares of Global Endurance Training Center. Among the most coveted awards is the War Mare National Award. The three mares I was riding placed 1st, 2nd and 9th among the top ten mares in the country. The War Mare Award is bestowed to the mare with most points accumulated throughout the ride season.

These mares also were in 2nd and 3rd place in the National Best Condition Championship standings. The most prestigious award, the National 100 Mile Championship Award, I achieved with GE Pistol Annie. She also won the AHA Half Arabian 100 Mile Championship title. In addition, these three mares took the top three spots in the Mountain Region Point and Best Condition Championships, respectively. 

As the winner, we received a new Freeform Saddle, donated by Paulita Neff from the Treeless Saddle Company. 

Receiving the National Championship Award by Susan Garlinghouse.

Why is this all significant?  And what do all these mares I rode in 2016 have in common?

These winning mares were ridden all season long with EasyCare hoof shoes and hoof boots. To be successful in these national competitions, a rider has to pay meticulous attention to every detail all year long: from nutrition to training and conditioning, from chiropractic work to dental care, from saddle fit to hoof trimming and hoof protection selection. The hoof protection of choice were EasyCare Glue-ons for GE Pistol Annie, Flip Flops for Medinah MHF and a combination of EasyShoes and Glue-ons for GE CCDRUS Star. I do not believe that we would have had that level of success, would it not been for the use of the EasyCare hoof protection. These superior products protect the soles, dampen the concussion for the joints and are lightweight. The horses can travel with more ease and comfort over rocks and hard ground. As we have seen so many times in the past, EasyCare is leading the charge again and can always be found at the forefront of research, development and success in the world. 

Here is another example for the spirit of innovation that has been demonstrated by EasyCare over the years: this new EasyShoe Flex pictured below will be released soon! I wrote in my blog last month about this exciting EasyCare product. I have been testing this new shoe for a while now and I am thrilled about it. 

From the National AERC Convention

By Christoph Schork

Global Endurance Training Center

EasyCare BETA Product Testing Program

EasyCare has started a new BETA testing program to help test, evaluate and review new products before they are sold to the equine marketplace. The first BETA test is well underway and is being tested all over the USA and several foreign countries. Early results are positive and we have encouraged testers to share their experiences and feedback via questionnaires and their own social media feeds.

The first group of BETA samples for the Easyboot Love Child went out the first part of February. Many of the testers have applied the new design, have completed extensive testing and have supplied initial feedback.

Above: Sossity and Mario Gargiulo's initial install.

Above: Daisy Bicking's install after several weeks.

Above: Rusty Toth's install after several weeks and an endurance race.

Love Child testing has been a huge success. We are now looking for BETA testers for the nail-on EasyShoe Flex. This new EasyShoe design has an internal metal core that allows hoof mechanism. We feel that it offers many benefits to the horse and hoof health. Independent heel movement, flexion in the quarters and is over molded in a urethane that absorbs concussion and has high abrasion. The urethane and spring steel are the key. Check out this short video of the spring steel core in action:

 

EasyShoe Flex spring steel core.

EasyShoe Flex ground surface.

EasyShoe Flex hoof surface.

We need farriers, vets and hoof care professionals to help test the new EasyShoe Flex design. This is a nail-on product. If you would like to help test the new EasyShoe Flex please fill out the following form by clicking this link: EasyShoe Flex BETA Testing Form. The application period for BETA testing the EasyCare Love Child has now ended.

Have a great March!

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President & CEO

I have been President and CEO of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof boot for the barefoot horse.

Introducing EasyCare's Veterinarian and Hoof Care Practitioner Account Representative

My name is Mariah Reeves and I’ve returned to EasyCare with excitement for my new role as Veterinarian and Hoof Care Practitioner Account Representative. I look forward to working with such a valued sector of EasyCare’s business with the purpose of maintaining healthy partnerships to maximize your success with our products. 

I was first introduced to EasyCare products in 2013 when I relocated to Durango, Colorado from Michigan. I was first put on a pony at 18 months old and was blessed to live a horse-crazy lifestyle until my departure for the mountains. The horses stayed behind with family and it was unknown when I would have the opportunity to re-enter the equestrian community again. A day after my arrival in this unfamiliar town, I was invited to interview with Garrett Ford and Kevin Myers. Two weeks later, I was headed to Tucson for training; it was a dream come true.

EasyCare Team gets hands-on with Pete Ramey in 2015

I was absent from EasyCare for the majority of 2016 and I could not be more delighted to be back. I feel passionate about EasyCare products and will to continue to stay up-to-date in the always-evolving world of natural hoof care. Together, we will share knowledge, supplement business, and continue to see the benefits that EasyCare supports.  The previous Veterinarian and Hoof Care Practitioner Representative, Debbie Schwiebert, has left me with big shoes to fill, but I am confident that I will be able to achieve my goals in serving as your go-to person for all-things EasyCare.

My priority is to supply you with the support you need so that your clients’ are beyond satisfied with the yielded results of EasyCare hoof protection devices. Our company values each and every dealer within our network and are proud to have you promoting our products. As a side note, please know that each representative here is capable of assisting you with your EasyCare needs and product questions. If I happen to be unavailable to you for a time-sensitive matter, please feel confident reaching out to another team member within our company.

I’m looking forward to working with you! You can reach me at (800) 447-8836 ext. 2252 or mreeves@easycareinc.com .

EasyCare Testers are Falling for the Love Child

An upcoming product in the pipeline at EasyCare is beginning its second round of testing to ensure a quality hoof protection device that bridges the gap between boots and shoes. It will be capable to be modified for custom applications, easy to glue, and reliable over all terrain. It’s stirring much excitement within the barefoot hoof care community and EasyCare is pleased with the results in its testing phases.

The EasyCare Love Child, Easyboot Glue-on, and the EasyShoe Performance. Photo credit: Rusty Toth.

Rusty Toth, talented barefoot trimmer and accomplished endurance rider, shares his thoughts on the preliminary product, which is presently referred to as the Love Child.
“Love Child/LC report: I'm simply in LOVE with this new shoe-boot merger. Coming on three weeks post application, many miles covered, numerous river crossings and lots of deep wet sand. Not a budge, holding strong and the tread will outlast the cycle. I'm thrilled, my new favorite! Thank you Garrett and EasyCare.”

Rusty using Artimud and Glue-U Shufill in this application of the Love Child.

The modifications that can be made to the Love Child apply to both performance and therapeutic uses. Sossity Gargiulo of Wild Hearts Hoof Care put her own creative spin on the product, pictured below. She also used Artimud putty to thwart off any microbial infection and dental impression material for additional solar support.

Mario and Sossity's glue applications are truly a work of art.

Daisy Bicking of Daisy Haven Farm is focused on hoof rehabilitation and uses several EasyCare products for unique therapeutic cases. Daisy is a farrier that primarily utilizes composite materials to treat and heal her horse clients. We are excited to have her on board to provide quality feedback. All of our testers out there contribute to a product that will help many horses in all disciplines, from stall to pasture to arena. 

Daisy's application of the Love Child presenting a modified breakover.

EasyCare does not yet have a date that this product will be ready for public sale. It is priority to make all necessary revisions to this product to ensure an A+ experience that EasyCare has been known to provide in the hoof care community. Stay tuned to our blog and Facebook for updates on the EasyCare Love Child. Interested in testing new and upcoming products? Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be in the loop on new products and upcoming trials.

Winter Ice Studs for the Easyboot Therapy Line-Up

Submitted by Mariah Reeves, EasyCare Customer Service Representative

EasyCare offers several products that can be used for assisting the healing process of several hoof-related conditions. The winter endorses situations that can make treatment all the more challenging. As ice season approaches, the use of studs in therapeutic hoof boots is in demand. Before drilling into your boots at the first sign of slick, it’s important to know which therapy boots are compatible with which ice studs that EasyCare offers.

EasyCare Quick Studs and EasyCare Original Ice Studs.

The Easyboot Rx, a go-to therapy boot, is suggested for stall use or very small turn out only. The boot is designed to be lightweight and breathable, which means it is not built to withstand large turnout conditions. If studs are necessary for the environment in which your horse wears the Rx, both the EasyCare Original Studs and the EasyCare Quick Studs may be used. However, it is important to monitor the Original Ice Studs as there is a small chance that the stud may migrate proximally within the boot. This could cause pressure to the sole if it goes unnoticed. Precautionary tip: The Rx boots include a 6mm Comfort Pad; after installing the studs, it’s a good idea to replace the Comfort Pad back into the boot to serve as a safeguard between the stud and the sole of the hoof. Sizes 00-4 take the 3/4" Original Ice Studs and size 5 and up take the 1" Original Ice Studs.

The Easyboot Transition, Easyboot Cloud, and Easyboot Rx.

The Easyboot Transition bridges the gap between a therapy boot and a pleasure riding boot. It offers durability that can hold up for light riding and a dual density sole that provides shock absorption and cushioning qualities. Because the Easyboot Transition presents a dual density sole, it is not recommended to use a stud that compromises it. Only the EasyCare Quick Studs are suggested for this particular boot style.

The Easyboot Cloud is the latest and greatest therapy hoof boot on the market. The Cloud is robust, yet comfortable and supportive. The Cloud Pad material compresses like memory foam and is designed to compress in a proportional relationship to the weight of the horse. The durability of the Easyboot Cloud allows the EasyCare Original Ice Studs or the EasyCare Quick Studs. Cloud sizes up to size 4 utilize the 3/4" Original Ice Studs. Sizes 5 and up take 1" Original Ice Studs. As a reminder, the Cloud is not intended to be used for riding purposes.

The Easyboot Zip and EasySoaker are not recommended for use with studs. For permanent traction, support and protection, check out Daisy's blog, "Have Ice, EasyShoes with Studs!".

Photo credit: Hank Blum

Using boots through the melting season will offer reassurance that your horse has adequate traction and support over the hard ground. Boots will eliminate balling up of snow in the sole and provide cushion until the Spring returns. Contact EasyCare to further discuss the best hoof boot option for your and your horse’s needs. 

At Least Once

Yes, I truly believe that each Hoof Care Professional should attend the yearly International Hoof-Care Summit in Cincinnati, Ohio at least one time in their life. It is an event packed to the brim with lectures and seminars. Organized by the AFJ, this year attendance was in the thousands. Farriers from all over the world attended and it is a great opportunity to meet them and exchange experiences. 

EasyCare Inc and Polyflex Horseshoes had partnered up and shared a booth side by side at the Summit. Great experience to work with Curtis Burns, in my opinion, the most experienced and best Hoof Care Professional in terms of gluing synthetic and polyurethane horse shoes.

EasyCare and Polyflex booth at the trade show.

 The Bootmeister explaining the advantages of the EasyCare products to visitors from all over the world.

Curtis Burns demonstrated quarter crack repair in front of many trade show attendees. 

Garrett Ford had some airline problems, so unfortunately he did not make it to the Trade Show. Some of the newest products developed by EasyCare, and meant to be showcased in Cincinnati, also fell victim to flight cancellations. Therefore the EasyCare Booth did not have all the new products at hand. Nevertheless, we had some of the newest and exciting EasyCare products on display and in cooperation with Curtis, I made it a go.

One of my all time favorite boots, the EasyBoot Flip-Flop, on display on the blacksmith buddy.

A joint production with Polyflex Horseshoes, the EasyShoe Flex is scheduled to get released onto the market in March. Watch this video here that explains the benefits of the Flex. The EasyShoe Flex will first be released in four sizes: 0, 1, 2 and 3. With a springsteel core, this shoe will flex just about like a hoof, like nature intended. The Flex is meant to be nailed on. Options are a dorsal clip or side clips. Another option is open heel or closed heel for frog support. Garrett Ford talked a little bit more about this in last weeks blog.

Not only was the Trade show a huge success with products on display from companies all over the world, the lecture series was filled with capable and iconic speakers like Mike Wildenstein, Simon Curtis, Dave Farley and my all time favorite: Brian Hampson. Brian has done extensive research on the Australian Brumbies and the Mongolian Takh horses like no other scientist in the world. His research has influenced the way we are looking and judging horse hooves in recent times. 

In Brian's lectures, you can learn a lot about the wild horses of the world. For example, did you know that 46% of all wild horses with hooves that we often consider ideal suffer from laminitis?

Photo from Brian Hampson's lecture. 

Looking at these hooves of wild mustangs in the image below, one might think of these being the ideal hooves everybody is striving to achieve.

What Brian Hampson found out in his numerous studies puts a damper on this illusion: these hooves might look appealing from the outside, yet inside these hooves have the highest percentage of pathologies. Specifically founder, laminitis, white line disease, navicular etc.

In the slide below, Brian is detailing the percentages of the pathologies found in his studies of the wild horse hooves in Australia:

Compare the wild horse hooves in the image above to this one below, taken from a horse in a wetter environment and representing hooves we see more commonly among our domesticated herds:

On first sight, we all would probably agree that this hoof is somewhat neglected and unhealthy. 

Yet, when checking more closely with digital radiology, nuclear scintigraphy and ultrasound the inside of hooves looking like this, one is astonished to find out that these hooves were among the healthiest in Hampson's studies. So the first impression is not telling us the whole truth or might actually totally fool us. Take home message is that the external looks of a hoof will not allow us to draw conclusions and pass judgement on how "healthy" the actual hoof, its internal structures and the digit inside really are. Interesting, isn't it? It sure taught me a lesson. That is the kind of invaluable stuff you learn at the Summit.

The learning experience all around was just amazing and, quite frankly, there is no better way to learn about Hoof Care, the newest scientific findings, meeting new friends and reconnecting with old ones but by attending the "Summit". See you there next year!

 

From the desk of The Bootmeister

Christoph Schork

Global Endurance Training Center

 

Best Practice: What Glue Work Works?

In the horse world there are “ways to do things”. Some of of these things we do because it is grounded in science and based on research and objective information.  Other things we do, maybe even most things, we do because “that’s the way it’s always been done”. This even applies to glue-on shoes. If you ask 10 farriers how to prepare the foot and apply a glue-on shoe, you’ll get 20 different answers. Many of them claiming this is the “way to do things”. Not only are there different kinds of glue, but difference kinds of shoes, and many variations on application methods!  So how do you know what to do to be successful?  What is the "best practice" when it comes to your glue-on shoe application? There are several ways to set yourself up for success.

Start with following manufacturer’s instructions to the letter. If you pick a certain brand of shoe and they have recommendations for glue application, the best place to start is the foot preparation and glue method that they recommend. The manufacturer wants you to be successful so it’s a great place to learn best practices. 

Many of you know I LOVE acrylic glue, EasyShoe Bond/Equilox, yet in applying shoes like the the Flip Flop and product testing the new “Love Child” I’m following manufacturer instructions and using urethane glue, Vettec Adhere, with the application.   

Next idea for learning best practices with your glue work: contact a practitioner who uses the shoe/glue and intended application method you’re looking to utilize. Many farriers are glad to share the tips and tricks of their successful glue work with other practitioners who want to learn. Best is to do a ride along and watch them work if possible. But many will be glad to answer questions over the phone, via email, or on social media.  

Another great way to learn is to attend a clinic. There are many learning opportunities out there for those who want to learn different glue and shoe methods. A clinic situation is often a stress free way to learn different glues and shoe applications and gain hands on practice with supervision from a trained professional.

Lastly, be meticulous in your own work. Write down the steps you’re using and keep your work space neat and clean. Practice your process in your mind and consider walking through the steps with each foot before applying the actual glue to the shoe…that’s GO time!  Additionally, take photos of your work, and track objectively how the horse's foot responds to the application you're using.  

Glue work is 99% preparation and only 1% actually doing it. The more thorough your preparations, the easier your applications will go, with less chance of failure.  And that way, on the small chance you do have a failure at one point or another, you’ll be able to pin down why and resolve it very easily. 


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