Flip Flop Forgiveness

Submitted by Mari Ural, Team Easyboot 2016 Member

Even if your horse doesn't have the perfect foot, give the Easyboot Flip Flops a chance.  Especially for those people who want to go barefoot, but feel they can't, Flip Flops are the perfect solution.

Heart's feet do not have the perfect shape for Glue-Ons or Gloves.  He does use them with help from a power strap, tape and extra glue because the shells tend to get a gap at the "v".  His foot just seems to be narrower towards the coronet band than at the base, although the trim looks great.

We decided to give the Flip Flops a whirl.  Knowing there would be some gapping we simply stuffed more glue into the gap.  It has worked out great.  He's been out in sand, rocks, gravel and even some nice footing!  He's quite happy in his Flip Flops.  He strides out and the Flip Flops are totally secure.  The best part is that nothing collects in them.  After the ride, there is no debris stuck inside the Flip Flops, they are clean as a whistle.  When we were in mud, some did squish into the boot.  However, when it dried it came right out again.

For those folks who wish to leave them on for a full trim cycle they are perfect.  All the fresh air any hoof could want. Thank you, EasyCare.

 

 

EasyCare Goes Cavalry at the Old Dominion

Submitted by Karen Neuenschwander, Team Easyboot 2016 Member

The Old Dominion 100 is a bucket list ride for many. Rocks, big climbs, heat, humidity, and more rocks make “the Beast of the East” a fitting nickname for this ride. To add to the challenge, there is an option to ride “Cavalry.” The rider must carry with them everything for the horse and rider (except for water) for the entire ride. I’ve been fascinated with the idea of attempting this challenge since I learned about it several years ago. When it came time to take my mare, Brooke, on her first 100 miler, I knew she’d be a good candidate to give it a try. She’s strong on mountain trails, tolerates heat and humidity well, and takes great care of herself without being too high maintenance.

Hoof protection was a big consideration since any gear for lost shoes or boots had to be carried. Easyboot Glue-Ons were the obvious choice for us. The key to Glue-On success is proper application to DRY hooves. In our damp, swampy Southeast Virginia climate, getting those hooves dry can take a little extra effort. Brooke and her buddy, Legalas, had a sleepover in my barn’s stalls the night before we applied the boots for some extra drying time. “Legs” will be doing Tevis next month in Glue-Ons applied by the EasyCare gluing team, so he did the 50 miler at Old Dominion to try them out. The next morning, I glued everyone’s boots (with lots of extra hands to help things go smoothly), and we headed to the ride.

A night in the stalls keeps everyone's hooves nice and dry before gluing.

Although I tried to minimize the amount of stuff that I carried, some necessities needed to be packed along. I used the EasyCare Deluxe Stowaway Pack to carry some grain, two spare Easyboot Gloves, and electrolytes. I had planned to use the Deluxe Pommel Pack for more storage in front, but upon trying it out, discovered that I actually preferred something a little smaller. One quick call to EasyCare, and the standard size pack arrived a couple of days later. It carried my drink bottles and Brooke’s all-important carrots! I carried my food in a small backpack designed for ultra-runners, and we were all set to tackle the ride!

Sporting our Glue-Ons and all of our gear.  Photo by Becky Pearman Photography
 
Our goal was simply to get a completion. We made time where the footing was good, trusting that the Glue-Ons would absorb concussion on the miles of forest service roads. Brooke was able to do her awesome power walk over the crazy rocks and up and down the steepest climbs, her boots providing great traction and protection on the uneven footing. In the end, we completed the ride in fifth place, making us eligible to compete not only for the Cavalry Trophy, but also the Old Dominion Trophy, which is judged similarly to Best Conditioned.
 

During the judging the next morning, Brooke trotted out sound and looked great for the vet exam. I was shocked and honored at the awards ceremony to learn we had won both the Cavalry and Old Dominion Trophies! I am so grateful to EasyCare for offering products that helped make our ride such a success!

 

Thunder's 5000th Mile in Repurposed Gloves

Submitted by Karen Bumgarner, Team Easyboot 2016 Member
 
My plan was simple: Order some comfort pads to put in Thunder's Gloves and go ride three days at Oregon Outback's beautiful Hallelujah Trail, put on by Dennis and Linda Tribby. Only I messed up and ordered 12mm pads and not the 6mm, which I have since returned and now have 6mm pads for the next time. But I needed something for this time. Never fear, I have a tube of Sikaflex to goop some boots on with. Hmmmm, I scrounge through my collection of used Gloves and come up with two that have some mileage on them that are still plenty good. Plan B, Sikaflex the Gloves on and take the gaiters off and voila - good as Glue-Ons.
 
 
One thing I love about Sikaflex is that it doesn't set up real quick. I can take my time and not hurry, I like that. So my first step is to loosen the screws on the gaiter because I will take it off eventually. Then I take the Glove and fill it with a generous amount of Sikaflex, smearing some up on the sides inside the boot too. I set the boot aside and do the last minute touches of being sure the hoof is clean and ready. With Sikaflex I don't have to buff the hoofwall and such like you do with Adhere, I like that too. Then I just put the Glove on as I always would, tapping it into place with the mallet and hooking up the gator. I have him ties eating hay which keeps him quiet for awhile as the Sikaflex sets up. After an hour or so I put him back out with his buds. The next day I remove the gator and head for the ride.
 
 
Thunder chowing down at the vet check on day one. Our Sikaflexed Gloves are performing well.
 

Thunder after the first 50, looking happy and ready for another day. (Photo by Trish Frahm)

Mid-day trotting down the great trails and enjoying life! The footing was awesome and we wouldn't have needed those comfort pads on this ride anyway. But it was sure nice to not have to worry about any rubs or irritation from three days of gaiters and Gloves. Thunder completed his AERC 5,000 miles with day two. And we finished up the weekend riding the third day and being a Pioneer.
 
 
Now here we are six days after "sikking" them on and I have the chore of removing the boots. They are still nice and tight.
 
 
The best way I know to get them off is find a spot to insert a flat sided screw driver and just start working it around the hoof and pull the boot and such away from the hoof wall.
 
 
It takes a few minutes of working the screw driver around the hoof but soon the boot is coming free of the hoof.
 
 
After loosening the sides all around, I insert the screw driver blade under the boot, working through the heel area, and it pops right off pretty easily.
 
 
‚ÄčAnother great thing with using Sikaflex is all the material is in or on the boot and your hoof is clean and has no debris stuck on it. We'll be ready to trim and Glove for the next ride, and go for more miles.
 

Editor’s note: the opinions expressed in this blog do not represent EasyCare’s official recommended gluing protocol for hoof boots. To learn more about the recommended gluing protocol, please see http://www.easycareinc.com/Our_Boots/Easyboot_glue-on/glue-on_fitting.aspx. Following the steps outlined by EasyCare will increase the success rate of any glue-on product.

 

Rookies Take it Off

When we glue hoof protection on, us rookies just hope we actually have the chance to remove it and that it doesn’t just fall off on its own or come flying off while riding. For the most part I have been very successful and the protection I have glued on stays in place for the entire duration. The Flip Flop was no exception. Since the Flip Flop is quite easy to glue you would think it would be easy off as well. Easy on, easy off, right? WRONG! The Flip Flop is not easy off. I’m not implying that it is difficult to remove when you need to do so I’m stating that these were not going to come off on their own and tools were going to have to be involved. 

This set of Flip Flops had been on just over 6 weeks, there was one tiny spot just above the junction of the base and the cuff that was coming unglued but it was in no way going to cause the Flip Flop to fall off.

In true rookie fashion I was not the most prepared, but if I were it wouldn’t be any fun right? If you have the Flip Flop application guide you will notice on the removal section it suggest either using a hoof knife or vibrating cutting saw. I do have almost everything anyone could ever need in my trailer but unfortunately a vibrating cutting saw is not something I have stashed away. I do have multiple, very dull hoof knives, so I was in luck.

I will admit, I did ask the man in the silver sneakers for tips on how to remove the Flip Flop and he said to make sure I was pushing the base away from the sole when cutting and to also not remove the entire base as I could use it the to peel the cuff away from the hoof wall.

Well, my awesome hoof knife was so dull that no matter how hard I tried it was not going to cut the junction without quite a bit of strength. As I was leaving the office that day we were talking about removing my Flip Flops and I had received another bit of advice from another man that unfortunately does not wear silver sneakers about rasping where the cuff and the base meet so that is exactly what I did. 

I made sure to really rasp the thickened part right where the junction starts, I believe that would have been enough if my hoof knife was sharper than a butter knife but I went ahead and did the entire junction.

Once my rasping was done I grabbed my super dull hoof knife, pulled the base down and the junction cut just like butter!

I cut about three quarters of the junction and then stopped. This allowed me to use the base as a handle to pull the cuff away from the hoof wall, it peeled with such ease and virtually no damage to the hoof wall. It also made my clean up much easier as there was only a thin line of Adhere left on the hoof wall.

The Flip Flop is almost as easy to remove as it is to apply, all you need is a rasp and some sort of knife. It doesn’t even need to be that sharp, although I would imagine it would make it much easier if the knife was sharp, and the rasp won't not be needed. It could also make the process more dangerous. I have never done well around sharp objects so I'll stick to the dull hoof knife for removal. When I wrote A Rookie Went Gluing: Flippin' Success with the Flip Flop I raved about how much I liked this new product. Well, nothing has changed after weeks of use and my horse being extremely comfortable. I think I maybe more in love now than I was to start.

 

Bowker Master Class in Australia

Traveling to the other side of the world to Australia is a surreal experience, 24 hours of air travel to land in a beautiful place full of completely different flora and fauna, let alone tremendously entertaining accents.

I recently had the opportunity to go to the Melbourne area of 'Straya, as it's often locally called (try saying this with an Australian accent), and attend Dr. Robert Bowker's master class at the Equine College of Podiotherapy.  The College is located at a fantastic facility, Mayfield, in Yarck, Victoria, and is a nationally accredited educational program run by "The Barefoot Blacksmith", Andrew Bowe.  

The master class is an advanced hoof course offered to students at the school. And while Dr. Bowker is from the USA, nothing like this 3-day master class with him is currently offered here in the US. It was an incredible opportunity to attend this class as it is not usually open to those not enrolled in the school. I was traveling to Australia to teach a Daisy Haven Farm Hoof Distortion and Glue/Composite Shoe Workshop and was invited to guest lecture on glue and composite shoe work at the Masterclass. Of course, I extended my trip to attend the entire program.  

Sitting and listening to Dr. Bowker at such a concentrated level helped me further understand the theories and anatomy he has been sharing with us for years. Dr. Bowker has always been a great influence in my approach to my work with the horse's foot and this master class just reinforced and enhanced my understanding of the function of the foot. Here are a few key thoughts that stood out to me from the course:

1. Most of the blood flow to the foot is going to the back part of the foot. 

It is commonly thought that the digital cushion does not have significant blood supply as the large vessels of the foot lead to the front of the foot, and the sensitive frog and digital cushion are pale in a dead foot. However the digital cushion is made up of mixoid tissue which has bazillions of micro vessels: like watering your garden, using a fire hose would eliminate top soil, however if you use the fire hose to feed many small sprinklers it will work to water the garden without damage. So the digital cushion actually has immense blood supply.  

This previous blog highlights some of Dr. Bowker's research on the circulation of the back of the horse's foot: How to Develop a Healthy Foot: Circulation Is It!.

2. Navicular syndrome is a whole foot problem, as opposed to being contained to just the back half of the foot.  

In comparison to a healthy foot, a horse with navicular syndrome will have:

  1. Lateral cartilages with greater size micro vessels indicating chronic inflammation.
  2. Digital cushion with less fibrocartilage and mass, the fibrocartilage is a key component in energy dissipation.
  3. Impar ligament and deep digital flexor tendon lesions associated with "navicular disease".
  4. Coffin Bone will have 1/3 less bone than all other horses age 2-31 when navicular syndrome is present, i.e. osteoporotic.
  5. Primary Epidermal Laminae are closer together indicating increased stress.

The newest information Dr. Bowker presented at the class was on fascia. Dr. Bowker has been doing dissections from the carpus down the distal limb examining the fascial sheets. So far no two horses are the same.

He has been able to draw preliminary conclusions from the dissections that indicate horses are not born with developed fascial bands. They develop over time in response to how the foot interacts with the ground and manages vibration.  

Key points:

  1. Fascia is an integrated binding fabric between and around muscles, bones, tendons and ligaments.  
  2. These structures “float” or are meshed within fascial layers and bands and develop and change over time.
  3. Many structures are connected through fascia where no other apparent connection exists. For example, the common digital extensor tendon connects all the way to the frog through fascia.  
  4. Dr. Bowker has observed that managing vibrations, especially at high frequencies has a negative impact on the fascia.  

This is just the tip of the iceberg of valuable information presented. My book of handouts is 3" thick and my notes are pages and pages long.

My favorite quote of the whole course:

"The unanswered questions aren't nearly as dangerous as the unquestioned answers."  Dr. Bob Bowker.

‚ÄčHuge thanks to Sarah Kuyken of Innovative Hoofcare Australia for hosting me in Melbourne and Andrew Bowe of the Australian College of Podiotherapy for allowing me to present some of my work with composite shoes and attend the master class.

For more information: www.DaisyHavenFarm.com and www.IntegrativeHoofSchool.com.

SOS June 2016: Buffy the Hoof Prep Slayer

Got some hoof prep and finish vampires that need slaying? Buffy to the rescue.

The Buffy is the fancy name for a Hoof Buffer Attachment. It is an absolute godsend for anyone who is out there gluing boots or shoes. Not only is it indispensable for quick and flawless hoof prep, it finishes hooves to give every trim and every glue on application a slick professional look.

So what is it? The Buffy is a rotary sander with an air bladder inside. It attaches to your existing drill (more horsepower is better) on one end and has a handle on the other. Slide on a sandpaper sleeve, inflate the air bladder, and let 'er buck!

Buffy comes with a valve stem remover/spare cap combo piece. You can replace the black plastic valve cap with this little unit or you can use it to remove the valve core if you felt compelled to change it out. It is not a different kind of valve for a different pump.

20 PSI is the optimum air pressure in your Buffy. A mountain bike shock pump is the perfect air pump for your kit. Small, lightweight, and a pressure gauge built right in. Pictured below is a Rock Shox brand pump purchased for about $25 off Amazon.

Should you puncture the air bladder that comes on your Buffy, EasyCare has spares available for purchase. Changing the bladder is no big deal, you can read all about it here.

The sleeves are available in ten packs of 60, 80, and 100 grit. 60 is great for prep and the finer 100 grit is excellent for finish work.

You can extend the life of your sleeves with the use of a belt cleaning stick-just buffy the stick to clean out the hoof wall and adhesive particles that gum up the paper.

Lots of folks use some kind of dust mask to keep inhalation of said particles to a minimum. We've seen everything from your basic hardware store dust mask to thin neck gaiters to the always stylish outlaw bandana. Check out Mario Gargiulo of Wild Hearts Hoof Care in Ventura, CA - thanks for the awesome photo, Mario.

Get in touch with us to find out more or to order your very own Buffy or to send us your dust mask selfies.

Debbie Schwiebert 1-800-447-8836 ext. 2224 dshwiebert@easycareinc.com

Rebecca Balboni 1-800-447-8836 ext. 2232 dshwiebert@easycareinc.com

Secrets of the Savvy

Secrets of the Savvy: your source for inside information on all things EasyCare.

Tevis 2016: Easyboot Elite Gluing Team At Your Service

Celebrating its 61st anniversary this year, the Western States Trail Ride will take place on Saturday, July 23, 2016. As the official hoof boot of the event, Easyboot has enjoyed a long and successful presence at the world's most challenging 100-mile event. For the fifth year in a row, EasyCare will be providing gluing application services to all competitors who wish to benefit from the competitive advantage Easyboot products are known for. 

Jenni Smith and Auli Farwa, on their way to a Haggin Cup win.

To build upon the success of past years' gluing activities, EasyCare has assembled a hand-picked team of the finest hoof boot gluing professionals in the country who will be on site at the Auburn Fairgrounds applying Easyboot Glue-Ons to more than one third of the competing horses in the 2016 event. The team is made up of Daisy Bicking, Josh Bowles, Jeremy Ortega, Deanna Stoppler, Pete Van Rossum and Derick Vaughn. Each of the hoof care professionals has been chosen based on their various successes and achievements in the hoof care world, and will be provided to the Tevis competitors at no cost. Scheduled to take place over two days at the fairgrounds in Auburn California, this hoof boot application will again set the highest standards in excellence for hoof protection application at the 61st anniversary edition of the Tevis Cup.

All competitors who wish to take advantage of the gluing team must make an appointment in advance. The 2015 gluing schedule is as follows:

  • Wednesday, July 20, 2016 Auburn Fairgrounds 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM.
  • Thursday, July 21, 2016 Auburn Fairgrounds 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM.
  • Friday, July 22, 2016 No gluing.

Please note the following six items:
    1.    Location - unlike prior years, gluing will only take place at one location: the Gold Country Fairgrounds in Auburn, California. There will be no gluing services offered at Robie Park this year. 
    2.    There will be no gluing services offered on Friday.
    3.    EasyCare will provide Easyboot Elite team members' gluing services at no cost. However, each rider is required to provide the boots and materials needed (new, unused and untouched Easyboot Glue-On shells; 1 tube of Adhere; 4 Adhere Tips; 1 tube of Sikaflex).
    4.    Please bring a horse that has been trimmed within the previous five days. Angles, toe length, heel height, etc. should all be pre-determined and implemented well in advance of your arrival in Auburn by you and your hoof care practitioner. The Easyboot Elite team will not be making any such changes as part of your gluing appointment. No shod horses will be accepted for appointments.
    5.    We request that all horses should have successfully completed at least one race in Easyboot Glue-Ons before attempting Tevis in Glue-Ons.
    6.    No gluing services will be offered unless an appointment has been booked in advance.

Members of the 2015 Easyboot Elite gluing team.

Easyboot Glue-Ons dominated Tevis again in 2015:

  • The Haggin Cup (Best Condition) was won by Jenni Smith on Auli Farwa wearing Easyboots.
  • Four of the top ten horses to finish were in Easyboots.
  • Nine of the top 20 finishers were in Easyboots.
  • Overall completion rate: 45%.
  • Non-Easybooted completion rate: 42%.
  • Easybooted completion rate: 55%.
  • 22% of all starting horses were in Easyboots.
  • 27% of all finishing horses were in Easyboots.

To book your Tevis 2016 gluing appointment, please call any of our Customer Service Representatives at 1-800-447-8836.

Kevin Myers

easycare-marketing-director-kevin-myers

Director of Marketing

I am responsible for the marketing and branding of the EasyCare product line. I believe there is a great deal to be gained from the strategy of using booted protection for horses, no matter what the job you have for your horse.

SOS May 2016-Stuck? Pro Tips for Removing Glue-Ons

We have quite a bit of content about how to glue like a rock star. Everything from hoof prep to using different materials to modifying glue-ons for any situation. We even address aesthetics in our quest for gluing perfection. By now, you probably have gluing down. Keeping the shoes and boots on is no issue-the trouble is getting those things off.

EasyCare Elite Gluer and all around great guy Pete Van Rossum of Ramona, CA helped us out with some pictures of a quick and simple method for removing glue-ons. Thanks for the great photos, Pete! 

Rasp through the cuffs and around the edges of the EasyShoe then rim or score the edge of the shoe with the edge of your rasp.

Using your pull-offs, start at the rear of the shoe and carefully roll it forward. Inching it along will ensure it's just the shoe that comes off. Go slowly. Better leave that hoof wall on the horse where it belongs.

Once the shoe or boot is off, all you need to do is clean up the remaining adhesive and cuff material with your rasp and hoof buffer.

So there you have it. One pro's method for getting unstuck without a fuss. Of course there is always more than one way to skin a cat. If you'd like to see more you might like Christoph Schork's blog about removing the Easyboot Glue-Ons or Garrett Ford's video showing two ways to remove EasyShoes.  

If you've come up with a different way that works for you we want to know about it!

Debbie Schwiebert 800-447-8836 ext. 2224 or dschwiebert@easycareinc.com

Rebecca Balboni 800-447-8836 ext. 2232 or rbalboni@easycareinc.com

Secrets of the Savvy

Secrets of the Savvy: your source for inside information on all things EasyCare. See you next month!

Flip Flop Suitability

The Flip Flops have been tested now in several endurance races. Absolutely no failures whatsoever! They have been working better than expected. Garrett Ford, owner and CEO of EasyCare Inc, posted on his FB page how the Flip Flops were on one of his horses hooves for over 8 weeks now and are still totally intact. On my blog from last month, Flip Flop In Action, I outlined the success I have had with them during the last few months, in training and in endurance races.  Since then, another one of Global Endurance Training Center's horses, Medinah MHF, won the Antelope Island 50 Mile Endurance event and also was awarded Best Condition, wearing the Flip Flops.

Trotting out Medinah MHF wearing Flip Flops for the BC showing.

So we now know and have proven that the Flip Flops work well. But why would we want to select a Flip Flop, and how do we choose from all the excellent EasyCare products which hoof protection to use for any particular horse? Why select a Glove over a Glue On, an EasyShoe over a boot, a Performance N/G over a Compete or a Sport, just to name a few? What criteria are we using for this selection?

To compare the suitability of all the EasyCare hoof protection products would cover too many pages to make it feasible for a single blog. So I will restrain myself to explore the suitability of the Flip Flops for today's blog.

What kind of hooves and what kind of hoof characteristics would benefit the most from the application of the Flip Flops? Before making an educated guess, let's quickly review the advantages of the Flip Flops:

- Only the dorsal part of the hoof wall will get glued. Therefore, at least half of the hoof wall is exposed to air.

- The Flip Flops come with a healthy amount of heel extension. This is supportive for the tendons.

- The Flip Flops are easier and faster to apply compared to the Glue-Ons.

Hooves that are soft and would strengthen and benefit from increased exposure to air could be good candidates. Horses with soft and long pasterns will receive additional heel support and prevent the over flexing of the pasterns and tendons.

When drawing the plum line through the center of the coffin bone, we see that the (red) plum line falls behind the heel support. Not an ideal situation. 

With the Flip Flop, the center of the canon bone is supported now. The pasterns are less likely to over flex and risk tendon injury.

Here is a different example of a hoof that could greatly benefit from a Flip Flop:

Hardly any heel growth observable here and the bulbs are almost flat with the heels. A Glue-On boot would be less favorable, while a Flip Flop will give not only support, but might also foster heel growth.

On the other side of the spectrum, let's look at this hoof and fetlock:

When drawing the plum line through the center of the canon bone, it comes out well ahead of the heel. Hooves like this, with more upright and short pasterns don't necessarily 'need' the heel support of the Flip Flops. They will do really well with Glue-Ons or Gloves or, like in this case, with EasyShoe Performance N/G.

When applying the Flip Flops, there are several options in regards to the sole. The fastest and easiest way is to just leave the sole as it is, not applying any sole glue whatsoever. I did use the Flip Flops without adding any padding, glue or other fillers to the sole. It worked very well. I never had a rock or any debris get stuck between the boot and the sole. I believe that the constant movement of the Flip Flop is helping to keep the sole clean. Furthermore, the sole is getting exposed to air and will stay hard and conditioned. Although I never had anything get stuck there, for endurance races I personally prefer to fill the bottom of the sole with some fillers, just to guard against the odd occurrence that a rock could get wedged in there and cause me some headache. I have a 'zero tolerance' policy in place for endurance rides. Nothing left to chance, I will safeguard against anything that I know could possibly happen.  I tried the Sikaflex and it worked okay, but it is a little cumbersome to deal with the Sikaflex squishing out from under the boot for a few hours and having to confine your horse for that reason. A better solution is the use of Vettec Equipak, Equipak CS or Equipak Soft. The Soft is designed for really sensitive hooves. It does not adhere quite as well to the sole compared to the other two Equipaks. For most horses, the Equipak and CS work really well. I like the Copper Sulfate added to keep the bacteria at bay. Because of the copper sulfate added,  the CS stays softer after being cured when comparing to the regular Equipak.

After the application of the Flip Flops with the Vettec Adhere, the Equipak can get injected. Most of the time you can just bend the Flip Flops back and inject the Equipak. Again, the EasyCare Educational Videos on the website show that very well. Should the space between Flip Flop and sole be too tight, one can drill a small hole into the bottom of the Flip Flop and inject the Equipak through this hole.

Below an example on how a Flip Flop will look with the Equipak CS applied to the sole.

These boots are still in place now after about four weeks of application and two endurance races.  No separation or seam breakage visible at any place. No real reason to take them off, would it not be for the fact that the hooves need trimming again soon. 

From the Bootmeister 

Christoph Schork

Global Endurance Training Center

www.globalendurance.com

 

A Tool for Everything

Submitted by Rusty Toth 

Meet Delilah, she is a 16.1 h former race horse I was introduced to to help her become sound again. She is a sweet and kind mare with some issues from less than stellar shoeing practices in her past. She has a low heel, long toe and very flat thin soles.

After a discussion with the owner, we decided to try the EasyShoe Performance. The frog stimulation, I believe, will help grow sole while getting her off the rough hard decomposed granite that is our ground in the Phoenix area. She was so tender standing on a mat she could not load one foot long enough to either directly or indirectly glue on the shoes. Poor girl gave it an honest try, but she just couldn't do it. Now what?

In trying to problem solve the situation, I remembered a blog from Christoph some time ago about modifying a shell into a shoe. Bingo! With the Adhere being so quick to set, the shell encompassing her hoof wall, she could set the bugger down quickly and with gusto, and I knew the boot would remain in place.

We truly have an excellent group of people collected with EasyCare. A quick call to Christoph to ascertain the size of hole required for the size of shell and we were off and running. I used a three and a half inch hole in a size #2 Glue-On shell. She needed the support of the base and frog.

Knowing how sore she was, I did not apply any glue to the sole surface, and applied Adhere to the wall of the shell only. Using a duct tape damn, I applied Vettec Soft to make her immediately comfortable. Knowing this product has zero sticking quality we will remove the packing in two weeks time to allow the sole to breath.

The owner reported the next day that Delilah was walking sound, landing flat and even heel first for the first time in a long time.  Problem solving at its best. I am grateful to be part of such an incredible team of people collected, using amazing products with an infinite ability to be used to solve any problem. Thank you EasyCare.