SNEAK PEAK: Options and adjustability are the theme of EasyCare's next line of hoof boots

By Garrett Ford, President of EasyCare Inc.

I had a friend reach out and ask if we have anything in the works for new hoof boots. He was impressed with the new EasyShoe Flex line but is a barefoot hoof boot guy at heart.  With the EasyShoe Flex complete, I let him know that we are now focusing on new hoof boot concepts and our goal is to bring two very competitive designs to our dealers and horse owners by early 2019. Building on EasyCare's longevity and experience in the horse boot business - over 47 years! - we have two boot prototypes undergoing strenuous endurance tests.

Performance Boot Sneak Peak

The first boot will be part of our performance line. It will be ideal for 50- and 100- mile endurance riders who ride fast, over long distances and through difficult terrain. And it will also be a great trail and recreational boot. The prototype has already placed first in two very rugged 50-mile endurance tests.

A Saturday prototype test. 32 miles to 12,700 feet elevation in 4 hours. The peaks in the background are over 14,000 feet tall.  

Tie for 1st and Best Condition at the SoCo Endurance event. The new design was flawless.  

You can look forward to options, adjustability and heel pivot from this new performance product line. The boot will be sold in 5 different configuration options and all parts will be interchangeable.

Some of the design features:

1. Hoof length and heel height will be adjustable. 

2. Heat fitting can be performed on all parts for exaggerated fit applications.

3. Several of the designs will pivot in the heel area.  

4.  One of the 5 configuration options will be a Glue-On shell. You can not only adjust the length, but also the density of heel cushioning, making this a very unique model.

The Glue-On Shell will have a rubber insert to help cushion the heel.  Shell is molded long and can be adjusted in length.  

5.  Add a gaiter and it's very similar to the Easyboot Glove with one exciting exception - it's a pivoting gaiter.

6. Take a look at the blue heel insert below. You'll be able to fully adjust the heel density with different inserts.

A gaiter that pivots with the heel.  Different density heel inserts.

7.  Easily adjust hoof length and heel height through a Heel Sling and Heel Counter. The two work in tandem to achieve a better fit on more hoof shapes. They're protected by a slip-on EVA cover, which can be replaced as needed.

The "Heel Counter" slides in the sole of the boot to accommodate different hoof lengths. The "Heel Sling" adjusts up and down to accommodate different heel heights. No velcro or cables.

8.  One of the new EasyCare boots will have a rear arching heel bulb to adjust both heel length and heel height. The Australian company Scoot Boot has a similar style and it has some nice features, but lacks the adjustment option.

 

Pleasure Boot Sneak Peak

In addition to the new performance line we are also close to launching a new boot in our pleasure category. It will be a great trail riding boot that's soft, flexible and adjustable. Here's a recent photo just before taking it out on a test ride.

 

We recognize that horses feet come in many shapes and sizes, so our new designs are focused on options and adjustability. Watch for more test results in 2018 and the full line to be available in early 2019. I think we're making great advances in our product innovations and both of these designs offer groundbreaking improvements to the hoof care and protection marketplace.

 

Garrett Ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof protection for the barefoot horse.

 

 

 

Game Changing Glue-On Tips

By Sossity Gargiulo of Wild Hearts Hoof Care

There’s no question the process of gluing can be daunting. There are a lot of steps and important skills to master. While I think there’s no better way to learn and build confidence than at a hands-on clinic like the “Glue On Hoof Protection” clinic that I, along with my husband Mario organized and presented at Cañada Larga Stables in Ventura, CA for the Pacific Hoof Care Practitioners, I understand that it’s not always convenient or affordable. That’s why I’m sharing some of the glue-on tips taught at the clinic. One of the participants called them “game changers!”

During the clinic we practiced with EasyCare’s Easyboot Glue-On and the EasyShoe NG. We chose these two products because of their versatility, which increases your chances for success. If you learn how to glue the Easyboot Glue-On and EasyShoe NG, you’ll have the skills necessary to apply almost any glue-on hoof product. 

Sossity heat fitting a modified Easyboot Glue-On

 

Glue-On Game Changers

  • With the Easyboot Glue-On we recommend heat fitting every shell. Getting the foot forward in the shell helps breakover and full contact with the shell on all parts of the hoof increases your glue adhesion success. When the heated shell is on the foot, hold the heated material against the hoof wall as it cools. This helps you feel for any gaps and press them tight.
  • Add slits to the top of a glue-on shell to get better contact and to conform to the hoof shape.
  • Put pressure against the shell when you heat fit and also when you are gluing.
  • For extra hard use or endurance horses, dremel in “glue grommets” around the dorsal wall of the Easyboot Glue-On shell. The glue will seep through the grommet holes and act like a nail, increasing your adhesion success. 

Glue "grommets"

  • Topdressing with a hoof buffy is not just about esthetics; it also eliminates that little trough above the glue bead that can catch moisture. Don’t skip this step!
  • When gluing on a composite shoe like the EasyShoe NG, surface prep is vital. The hoof and shoe both need to be clean, dry and ‘roughed up.’  Before starting the prep process, make sure your work area is clean, dry and dust free. Don’t use fly spray in your work area. 
  • Use a small roll of cellophane to wrap the hoof and shoe in. This helps you hold the shoe in place as the glue cures, speeding and strengthening the glue bond.
  • During the hoof prep, establish a point of “no touching the hoof” and actually announce it! This helps to remind you and anyone helping you not to contaminate the surface. From this point forward you should only hold the hoof by the pastern or leg.
  • Double or triple glove, peeling a layer as you move to the next step. This saves time and frustration! Have you ever tried to put a glove on a sweaty hand, especially when you are literally “under the gun?”
  • Do you know which glue product to use? It’s important to know the difference. For example, an epoxy like Vettec Adhere cures gradually but quickly, and an acrylic glue like EasyShoe Bond cures in one specific moment when the glue suddenly gets really hot. Then it starts to cool down immediately.
  • Add hoof packing after gluing to prevent possible hoof wall contamination.

I hope you’re able to use some of these tips with your own horse and in your trimming business. If you’re interested in learning more about heat fitting, or modifying and applying glue-ons, look for us at a future Pacific Hoof Care clinic.

- Sossity Gargiulo
Wild Hearts Hoof Care

 

What Happens When an Abscess Goes Untreated

By Nancy Frishkorn BA, CHCP (reposted from
 
If you own horses, chances are good that at some point either you or someone you know spent many hours tending to an abscess. An abscess is collection of pus in an area of the body (in this case the hoof capsule) that causes severe pain and swelling due to the body’s immune system’s attempt to fight off the infection. This pus is actually excess white blood cells and tissue (living and dead), fluid, bacteria and other foreign substances. The white cells are the body’s natural defense to infection that release destructive components after identifying and binding with bacteria. Their purpose is to “kill” the harmful bacteria, but in the process healthy tissues are also damaged. In the hoof, this damage most often occurs in the laminae and bony structure within; in other words, if not treated, the coffin bone itself begins to degenerate and weaken, causing small pieces to break away. As part of the inflammation response, more white cells are sent to the site to remove the damaged tissue (the clean-up crew) which actually creates even more inflammation and subsequently more pain. The pieces of broken and damaged tissue are not distinguished by the body and the natural immune system subsequently treats them as foreign objects; hence, the system treats the bone pieces as “foreign objects” - these are what are known as sequestrum.
 
This is the story of Colt, a beautiful gelding purchased by Carla (Pittsburgh Pet Connections CEO) who had poor hoof care before she found him. There are some individuals who believe the hooves can go months without trimming, and others who feel they can trim themselves despite the fact that they have had no training or poor training at best. Colt was one such victim of circumstance, and he came into Carla’s love and devotion in need of immediate attention. His hooves were long and imbalanced, and after two trims he was still experiencing intermittent lameness. Local vets were called and his abscessing was opened, but they continued to fester despite many hours of soaking, draining and treatments with drawing salve. After seeing no improvement, it was decided he needed to seek clinical attention for a second opinion and x-rays. 
 
Colt was sent to Fox Run Equine Center where Dr. Brian Burks DVM diagnosed a lateral sequestrum on Colt’s left front hoof. This first picture shows Colt’s tract on film; you can see some lines coming from the side of the hoof draining down by the back of the heel. 
 
 
This is the site that had been opened from the outside bar (hoof wall beside the frog) but never drained out completely. Inside, there is a piece of broken bone that was damaged due the accumulation of pus for a long period of time. Dr. Burks used a dremel tool to drill a small hole into the quarter (side of the hoof wall) to remove this sequestrum. The second picture shows the piece of bone being removed and just how small the piece of bone was; its removal was imperative for Colt’s recovery.
 
 
The third picture is a shot of this same area after surgery, the quarter area grew out within three months with daily packing with betadine and Sliver Sulfadiazine.  
 
 
Before the surgery, Dr. Burks scraped out all the hard laminae from the bottom of the hoof to ensure there would be no residual bacteria’s invading the capsule that could potentially cause reinfection of the hoof. His intuitions served him well when it was discovered that the very tip of P3 (coffin bone) was extremely brittle. He concluded that this was damaged a long time ago from old abscessing that had caused this area to weaken and nearly break away. By making another “window” in the hoof wall, Dr. Burks was able to preserve most of the wall structure and remove this weakened area as well. He commented to me that the tip “fell away” when he merely touched it with his forceps, so it too was removed and needed packing until it grew out. This fourth picture shows the actual procedure during surgery when the forceps were inserted into the toe wall to remove the sequestrum. 
 
 
I’ve worked with many vets over the years, but I’ve never met one quite as thorough and open minded as Dr. Burks. The traditional protocol for any respective procedure is hospital plates (wide aluminum shoes) that stay on for many months to support the hoof during healing. Because Burks took such care to make minimally invasive openings for removal, Colt was left with adequate hoof wall for support. Carla was adamant in keeping Colt as natural as possible, meaning she wanted him to remain barefoot, and he respected her wishes. I was called to meet with Burks about follow up hoof care and we mutually agreed he could remain in a hoof boot that would not only support his hoof, but also provide better coverage for the opened areas that needed daily treatments. This last picture shows Colt’s open toe area five days after surgery when he was taken out of wraps and placed in a hoof boot. 
 
 
Treating a hoof injury is difficult on the owner as well as the horse. Carla was going to need a boot that would not only cover the entire hoof wall, but also one that could be easily removed and strong enough to withstand several months of continuous wear. Colt was rather stubborn about lifting the hoof for his daily treatment, so ease of application was an absolute necessity. I am familiar with several boots, but the best choice for this situation called for durability, full support and easy removal as well so that no further damage would occur. I could think of only one boot that would serve her purpose, and one that she would be able to keep for years to come in case she ever needed them again - the Easyboot Rx
 
From March to mid-May Colt wore his boots day and night. He was sound at a walk almost immediately after the surgery and because he had a boot he was able to get turnout in the arena and a small paddock every day. We actually booted both front hooves to make sure he wasn’t off balance on the front and this kept him sound while simultaneously avoiding any shoulder pressure or further injury. Carla made sure that his hooves were kept as dry as possible to avoid any rubbing due to excess moisture or sweat by removing them daily for treatments and drying the back of the hoof before replacing it. This movement helped facilitate the healing process and by the end of May the entire wall had grown out completely with no further problems. Within a month Colt was even able to do short rides wearing hoof boots and today he is doing very well. He has not had an abscess in nearly a year and his soles are tough because he has relocated to a facility that enables full turnout and natural wear. Carla has since purchased a pair of Easyboot Trail boots for long rides, and we are grateful to not only EasyCare for their supreme products, but also to Dr. Burks for his open-minded approach to natural horse keeping. Thanks to Carla, Colt has a wonderful life and his hoof issues are no longer…he is happy, healthy, and sound. 
 
- Nancy Frishkorn BA, CHCP

 

Easyboots Battle White Line Disease with DE Hoof Taps. To Tap or not to Tap?

By Rachel Braverman of Polyflex Horseshoes

Shod, glued, booted or barefoot it’s no wonder that our horses end up with some form of compromised hooves when we consider the elements they’re exposed to. Climate extremes, bacteria, abrasive surfaces and athletic demands all influence the health of our horses’ feet - and for many of us the frustration of addressing hoof wall separations, excessive wear and the challenges that stem from them can seem never ending. Just as one problem seems to disappear - another arrives unannounced.

The good news? The answer may be as simple as tapping your feet.

Named after its inventor and longtime farrier Doug Ehrmann, DE Hoof Taps are a product that offers an entirely new approach to hoof care.

DE Hoof Taps in hoof

DE Hoof Taps were inserted to assist this horse with wall separations.

Created because of his need for a real solution, Doug explains “Up where I shoe, inclement weather and abrasive surfaces like stone dust arenas are commonplace. So many horses were having chronic issues with excessive wear, wall separations and overall loss of hoof integrity. I remember thinking to myself - I have to find a better way to help.”

So after years of research, field trials and evolutionary stages Ehrmann formally introduced DE Hoof Taps to the market in 2018 and since then has produced noticeable and exciting results for the future of farriery.

A zinc coated steel tap measuring approximately 1.25 inches in length, DE Hoof Taps are inserted into the foot just outside of the white line. Left in for the duration of the shoeing cycle, DE Hoof Taps are most commonly used under traditional shoes. However, great success has also been seen utilizing the taps under glue on synthetics, in booted horses and the barefoot horse. “I designed them to be versatile,” Ehrmann clarifies, “horses of all disciplines and shoeing methods can at some point face the challenges these taps are meant to combat. That’s why it was so important for me to create a product that could be used as an accessory for any horse.”

DE Hoof Taps with Easyboot Epic

DE Hoof Taps can be a great option for booted or barefoot horses suffering from brittle hooves and wall separations. This horse is shown prepped to ride in an Easyboot Epic. 

This versatility is just one feature that’s made DE Hoof Taps a popular choice among industry professionals. Farriers are reporting significantly tighter white lines, healed wall separations and a marked decrease in excessive wear. Simply visit the DE Hoof Taps Facebook page and a plethora of before and after case studies illuminates the screen. While Doug is no newcomer to product innovation, his ultimate standard remains the same. “If I’m going to bring an idea of mine to fruition - it needs to be a product that I reach for and that I use on a daily basis without having to think about because it works. The DE Hoof Tap has become exactly that product for me.” Based on growing product demands, it’s obvious these taps are quickly becoming a go to product for farriers across the U.S.

While the positive feedback and documentation has been consistent - the inevitable question comes up.

How exactly do DE Hoof Taps work?

The answer, is that the answer is still evolving. What we do know for certain is that the zinc coating plays a major role. On a chemical level, zinc is said to attract existing bacteria and repel new bacteria. Ehrmann’s hypothesis is that if the tap is inserted into a compromised foot, then the zinc coating will draw the bacteria towards itself. In turn, it’s believed that the zinc aids in rerouting the bacteria from traveling up the tubules of the hoof wall. As a bonus the steel makeup of the tap aids in reduction of wear on the hoof.

“We’re continually discovering more about how they work,” Ehrmann admits, “but the exciting part is that we’ve seen over and over again the positive impact they make on horses feet. They produce results too good to ignore.”

Mechanically speaking, Ehrmann designed the taps to mimic the natural curvature of the white line and to remain within the foot at a shallow depth. While the taps are not intended to be shaped, they can be easily modified to match the needs of the foot.

Some examples include shortening the taps to be placed in smaller, more specific locations, inserting the taps at the toe and in the heels. “In some cases you may only choose to use part of a tap, while in others you may decide to use multiple. The decision is ultimately up to the discretion and knowledge of the farrier using them,” Ehrmann explains. He continues “The more skilled you are as a farrier the more you’ll be able to utilize the potential of these taps to their full extent.”

To remove, easily pull or trim the taps out at the end of the horses shoeing cycle. The uncomplicated process just makes taps that much more appealing. However, it’s important to understand that the DE Hoof Tap is not a DIY product.

While the simplicity of the DE Hoof Tap makes it a natural addition to any farrier’s shoeing box, Ehrmann cautions that taps should only be inserted by a hoof care professional. “This product is simple to use, and that’s one of the best parts about it - but it still needs to be respected as a tool. If you think your horse could be a good candidate, have the discussion with your farrier. He or she will be able to place the tap where and how it will benefit your horse the most.”

Designed with the good of the horse in mind, it’s exciting to consider what the future holds for the DE Hoof Tap. Many believe this product could be the representative product of a new generation of hoof care technology to come. It certainly defines out of the box thinking - and offers a new platform from which to approach hoof care. Not to mention it offers a creative addition to any farrier’s toolbox.

But if there is one thing we can count on, it’s for Doug Ehrmann to keep innovating.  So long as there is a horse in need, whether shod, glued, booted or barefoot they will now have the opportunity to tap their feet.

- Rachel Braverman
PolyFlex Horseshoes

Looking Beyond Frequent Hoof Trimming as the Magic Fix for Hoof Rehab

By Hoof Care Practitioner David Landreville of Landreville Hoof Care

If you’re struggling with hoof issues, don't fool yourself into thinking that merely trimming more frequently is going to be a magic fix. There’s always a learning curve and there are often kinks in that curve.   

The key to lameness prevention, rehabilitation, and continued development is keeping the outer wall off of the ground.

To accomplish this, I believe that optimum weight bearing is when the inner wall is loaded at the Four Pillars. I don’t try to make it happen in one trim. It’s built over years of frequent trims. After trimming to the inside of the inner wall, it takes three weeks for the inside of the outer wall to make it to the ground (with this kind of trim), which is why I try to keep them on no more than a 3-week trim schedule. The second and third weeks are the optimum comfort weeks for the horse. The inner wall, through its attachment to the sole, is set up to support the weight of the horse. The strength of the outer wall is not in its ability to support the weight of the horse, but in its ability to contort while simultaneously resisting the forces of contortion. 

Frequency is only part of the equation.

The trim has to unload the outer wall and put the majority of the horse's weight bearing comfortably on the back of the feet. Correct weight bearing and movement is what heals feet. The trim just sets the horse up for healing.  1/16" of vertical error at the ground equates to 2 inches of horizontal displacement at the wither on an average size horse. 

Too much weight bearing on the forehand causes excessive toe loading.

When the lateral heel on a left front foot is continually being left 1/8" longer than the medial heel it causes the horse to shift their weight 4" to the right. This places the right front 4" closer to the midline of the horse. This results in the majority of the horse's forehand weight being supported by the right front.  Most horses are already too much on their forehand due to the lack of knowledge about the relationship between proper heel shape and caudal soft tissue development.  A horse that has natural downhill conformation and who is also naturally right forelimb dominant can be a disaster in the making. The right front becomes the crutch for the horse, resulting in mechanical founder in the right front. The symptom may be wall separation and/or sole penetration but the cause is 1/8" margin of error in the trim. This is not a disease; it’s a breakdown in the mechanical bond from excessive force. Keeping the horse properly squared up over their heels is how you fix them. 

Example of improper trimming for founder.

When you're rehabbing founder, you're essentially taking the horse back in time through all the phases of their foundering. Helping a horse get comfortable is only the beginning of restoring them to a point where continual development is sustainable. 

This is the right front foot of a right hand dominant horse that foundered due to improper trimming.  These photos show 7 months of progress to reverse the damage.

Photo of improper trimming for founder

This is a caudal view of the same horse. 

Don’t rely on frequent trimming as the magic fix.

Trimming more often may just create a disaster – faster. I’ve found that a good trimmer/owner team is central to the horse’s successful rehab. Choose a trimmer who not only knows how to fix a hoof problem, but who does meticulously correct work and who also knows how to prevent it in the first place. How do you find out? Ask lots of questions! (Tip: Do they have horses of their own with structurally sound bare feet that they’ve been riding for years?)

And finally, be upfront how an issue will be handled. The trimmer should have a couple back up plans and the owner should be clear about how willing they are to go the distance if plan A doesn't work out.

 

- David Landreville

www.landrevillehoofcare.com

Here's an Easy Way to Install an EasyCare Comfort Pad

By EasyCare Product Specialist, Jean Welch

An EasyCare Comfort Pad is a great way to provide added comfort, support and protection for your horse. It comes in a one size fits all, and is a quick trace and trim in most cases. But if you don't have a template, try this handy tip that I picked up from Chris Mason at a Hoof Care Conference in the beautiful state of Washington. Not only does it make it simple to custom fit your Comfort Pad, but it also prevents any waste. There's a very good chance you'll be able to squeeze more than one pad out of just one Comfort Pad!

Comfort Pad Installation

1. Get some tin foil that's about two times the size of the outer sole. In this example, I'm using a Size 1 Easyboot Glove.

2. Fold it in half to make it stronger.

3. Insert it into the boot, and scrunch the edges of the foil up against the inside of the boot.

4. Carefully remove the foil from boot, and voilà, you have a perfect template of the boot's inside foot bed.

5. Lay out your pad and trace your foil template.

6. Use heavy duty shears to cut the pads out. Remember to keep your cut to the INSIDE of the line.

If you have Easyboot Mini's, just think of all the pads you can get out of one Comfort Pad.  I tried this tip on a Size 2 Mini and got 11 pads!

Save the scraps and you can even make your own frog supports as well.

If you'd like more product tips, we have a lot of helpful articles on our Hoof Care Blog and videos on our YouTube channel.

100-Mile Tevis Cup: One of the Top Ten Endurance Competitions in the World!

The 2018 Tevis Cup is in the books. Of the 149 horses who started the event, there were only 64 finishers. That 42% finish rate tells us how grueling this 100-mile trail is and why the Tevis Cup ranks as the most difficult horse race in the world.  

Time Magazine compiled a list of the Top Ten Endurance Competitions in the World.  The list contains the 24 Hours of Le Mans, The Tour De France, Dakar Rally, Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, Cannon Ball Run, Four Deserts, The Tevis Cup, Marathon des Sables, La Ruta de los Conquistadores and the Vendee Globe.  

The Lead Pack at the 2012 Tevis Cup.

As you look through the list of ten competitions there are several that stick out and peak my interest.  The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race has always fascinated me because of the difficulty and the bond that the humans have with their dogs.  To travel 1,150 remote miles through difficult winter conditions as a team is hard to fathom.  The Tour De France is another mind bender.  Over 2,000 miles on a bike lasting roughly 20 days.  And on the Marathon des Sables six-day, 150-mile run across the blazing hot southern Moroccan Sahara, runners must carry they own food and water for the entire run. 

The 100-Mile Tevis Cup is the only equine event on the list and is the start of endurance events around the world.  Have you ever wondered why you receive a belt buckle for finishing a 100-mile run or a 100-mile mountain bike race?  The belt buckle awarded at the Tevis Cup has been adopted by events like the Western States 100 Mile Run and the Leadville 100 Mountain Bike Race.   The Tevis Cup helped kick-start many of the events the endurance junkies dream to one day conquer.

My inner legs after the Tevis Cup.

Here's what Time Magazine had to say about the Tevis Cup:

A 24-hour, 100-mile horse ride from Lake Tahoe to Auburn, California, the Tevis Cup was first held in 1955. The important thing to know about this race is found on the Tevis Cup FAQ: "The weather conditions from year to year are mostly the same: HOT and DUSTY." One of the major difficulties here is not just getting your horse to the finish line, but making sure your horse is still "fit to continue" when it reaches the finish line. If you do so, no matter what place you come in, you get a silver belt buckle. That's right: 100 miles in 24 hours. For a belt buckle.

 

Lisa Ford climbs Cougar Rock.  Note the difficult footing.

For EasyCare the Tevis Cup has a special place.  The Tevis Cup is where we go to test our products.  The rocks, dust, distance, climbs and descents put extreme demands on the equine hoof and the hoof protection used.  It's just a matter of time before your horse steps on the perfect sharp rock and your ride is over.  Over the past 63 years roughly 50% of the riders that have started the race have finished.  The majority of the non finishes are because of lameness and the challenges caused by the rough trail.  

EasyCare started placing emphasis on the event in 2009 and used the event to test our urethane hoof protection.  My goal was to have our products excel at the toughest equine competition in the world. It's an event where you can't fake results, and where results trump marketing - it really tells you if something works. 

Easyboot Tread after the difficult 100-mile Tevis Trail.

EasyCare has found that not only have our unique urethane hoof protection products worked, but they have helped horses excel. Since we started recording the stats at the Tevis Cup on horses wearing Easyboots back in the 2009 we have found the following:

1. From 2009 to 2017, horses wearing Easyboots finished 63.64% of the time. Horses not wearing Easyboots finished 50.77% of the time. (We're still finalizing 2018 stats)

2. 6 out of the last 9 Tevis winning horses wore Easyboots.

3. 8 of the last 9 Haggin Cup winning horses used Easyboots.  The Haggin Cup is the horse that is deemed the most fit to continue and able to do the 100 miles again. 

4.  Although we don't have full stats, 2018 was no different. Six of the top 10 horses to cross the finish line were in EasyCare products. Four were in Easyboot Glue-Ons and another 2 were in EasyShoe Performance N/G urethane shoes. And this year's Haggin Cup winner, owned by Mark Montgomery, was in EasyShoe Performance shoes. The Haggin Cup winners in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 were all outfitted in EasyCare products. Not a bad run!

 

The 2018 Haggin Cup winner in EasyShoes, owned by Mark Montgomery.
Congratulations to MM Cody ridden by Mykaela Corgnell.

 

EasyCare is very proud to have our products tested and trusted by the Tevis competitors in the US and around the world. Thank you for believing in our urethane hoof protection products.   

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof protection for the barefoot horse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shoeing The Hoof Or Shoeing The Horse?

By Christoph Schork of Global Endurance Training Center

Horses hooves do have "big shoes to fill," pun intended. Not so much because of previous great shoeing experiences but more so because of their responsibility to carry a heavy body through life's travels. Whether it's just hanging out as a backyard horse, competing on the track, dressage, versatility, trail riding, endurance racing or competing on demanding 100 mile races like Big Horn, Old Dominion, Biltmore or Tevis.

GE Blizzard of Oz, wearing the new EasyShoe Flex during the Old Pueblo Ride in Arizona, finishing in First Place and winning Best Condition

When talking about shoeing or booting horses, are we shoeing a hoof or are we shoeing the horse? Now, what does that question entail? In the definition of a farrier's job description, he or she is engaging in 'horse shoeing.' Nobody refers to a farrier as a 'hoof shoer.' For the sake of an argument, let's look at the term 'hoof shoeing' first.

Shoeing a hoof means that we are looking specifically at a hoof, trimming it according to our parameters and then booting or shoeing that particular hoof. We might be looking at live sole, medial and lateral balance, point of rotation and midpoint balance. We are evaluating and trimming and shoeing a hoof!

When trimming and shoeing a horse, I follow an holistic approach to hoof care. First I evaluate the conformation and posture of the horse, then I consider the weight and the alignment.

As an example of how we trim and shoe to provide support for the whole horse, not just a single hoof, we'll look at the horse below.

This image shows an untrimmed hoof. We can observe that the hoof is pretty symmetrical in appearance from the dorsal view point. If we draw a red line through the center of the fetlock we can see that both halves of the hoof are equal in width.

Here's a similar observation on a horse with a trimmed hoof.

In both cases the horse's body is supported by the hoof. The whole hoof is equally loaded and receiving equal ground pressure.

In the next case, however, the hoof cannot fulfill its job of properly supporting the horses weight. The plum line drawn from the center of the canon bone does not divide the hoof capsule in equal halves. Notice how it's offset to one side. The lateral half of this front right hoof is quite a bit wider compared to the medial half. (Blue horizontal line vs green line.)

My next question is how can I mitigate that conformation fault and center that hoof better under his leg? For starters, when trimming, I'll rasp the lateral wall a little more and the medial wall somewhat less, to try and move the hoof more underneath the bone column. 

Look at the two blue vertical guide lines coming up from the supporting area of the sole. The leg is now more centered over the sole. I shifted the support area medially.

When shoeing or applying hoof protection to this hoof EasyCare provides the tools to center the hoofs ground bearing surface even more under the leg. The new EasyShoe Flex is the perfect shoe to help horses with asymmetrical hooves.

Here's how the Flex can be used to help center the hoof under the limb.

In this photo, I moved the Flex more to the medial side (see the red arrow), to center the bone column over the supporting surface.

The weight baring surface of the Flex is now centered under the red plum line, and both lateral and medial (yellow lines), are equidistant between the two blue vertical guide lines again. 

The protruding edge, red arrow, can easily get beveled off so a horse would be less likely to step on it and pull the shoe off.

With a grinder or even a rasp the shoe can get easily modified. The spring steel insert can also get rasped without any problems. 

Stay tuned, because I'll be sharing more information on the Flex. You'll learn how easy it is to nail on the Flex, get some DOs and DONT's, and see my test results on their performance during long and hard endurance races up to 100 miles in length. I'll also be including the Flex Light, the version without the spring steel core.

In the photo below, the Flex Light, in a size 3, is shown on top. It comes with the heart bar for frog support. Below the Light is the Flex Open Heel with spring steel core, also in a size 3. The steel inside gives it enough rigidity so that a heart bar isn't necessary. It's also available in a heart bar version.

The Flex is opening a lot of new doors for the riders, farriers and trimmers alike. 

From the Bootmeister
Christoph Schork

www.globalendurance.com

5 Reasons Why the Easyboot Glove Soft is Outperforming Expectations

By Garrett Ford, President of EasyCare Inc.

The Glove Soft has been a challenge to keep in stock!

The Easyboot Glove Soft was added into the EasyCare line up of hoof boots in early 2018.  It's been selling very well and exceeding our forecasts.  Several sizes have sold out and we are working hard to get more in stock for the busy summer months.  

The Glove history goes back to 2009 with the launch of the Easyboot Glove. We've made a number of improvements over the years, and while people have been very happy with it, the rubber gaiter on the 2016 model makes it a bit more challenging to install. This feedback, along with other comments from our valued customers, resulted in the design and launch of the Glove Soft. 

The Glove line has always been a favorite. You can see why in the video below. It shows the original Glove in action during a very difficult 50-mile race. Even in terrible, muddy conditions down slipper terrain, the boots stayed on with no problems. Notice the Glove's low profile and snug fit that allows the horse to be the athlete it is. The horse went on to finish 1st and receive Best Condition. (If you watch the video to the end, you'll notice I took a tumble, but kept on filming!)

 

Here's a quick list of what we were trying to achieve with the Easyboot Glove Soft and the reasons horse owners like the boot so much.  

1.  The Easyboot Glove line is the closest fitting hoof boot line. It doesn't add bulk and width to the hoof, allowing the horse to be athletic and nimble.  

2.  The ability to fold the gaiter back all the way. This achieves a very easy installation of the hoof boot. When the gaiter is folded backward it's quick and easy to slip over a hoof and get a tight fit.  The gaiter is then rotated up and fits around the pastern.  

3.  Wider hook and loop make for a better hold and closure. We have beefed up the hoof and loop for a more secure fit. Now it's 1.5 inches wide.  

4.  Longer straps allow the boot to fit more pastern circumferences.   The overlap system and longer straps allow the gaiter to fit both large bone and finer bone pasterns.  

5.  The Glove Soft comes in both regular and wide sizes.  The range has 20 different sizes to fit most horses.

We appreciate your feedback on the Glove line and are excited that the Easyboot Glove Soft is part of our 2018 product range.  We are working hard to prevent back orders, so please be patient.

Enjoy your summer riding.

Garrett Ford

easycare-president-ceo-garrett-ford

President 

I have been President of EasyCare since 1993. My first area of focus for the company is in product development, and my goal is to design the perfect hoof protection for the barefoot horse.

 

 

Your Glue-On Shopping List

By EasyCare Product Specialist, Regan Roman

As an EasyCare Product Specialist, people ask me all the time what items they need to get started in the world of Glue-Ons. I decided to compile a list with everything you will need to get started, why you need them and a few helpful tips. Keep in mind that the best tool of all is a qualified Hoof Care Practitioner who is experienced in gluing. Although not necessary in every case, a glue-on expert is the best way to go.

First off, we always recommend ordering an Easycare Fit Kit before getting started. It will help you to determine the proper size EasyShoe for your horse. You'll receive three different sized shoes in the EasyShoe of your choice - one in the size you specify, one a size larger, and one a size smaller. And it works like a rental program! You can make sure the shoe fits before making a purchase!

 

When you're finally ready to order your pair of EasyShoes, here's a list of the additional items you'll want to include in your shopping cart:

Items Needed

*Note: Items without links are not sold by EasyCare.

 

Optional Items

  • Moisture meter
    For checking the moisture in the hoof. You want it to be at 0%.
  • Hoof Buffy
    The hoof buffy cleans up the hoof to prepare it for the gluing, just like exfoliating before shaving your legs.
  • Buffy sleeves 10 pack
    The buffy is made with a 60, 80 or 100 grit sand paper which should be replaced after every few uses.
  • Buffy Bladder
    This piece gives shape to the Buffy sleeve allowing the sand paper to scuff up the hoof wall.
  • Easyboot Zip
    The Zip is designed to keep your horse hoof clean before gluing or bandaging.
  • Spacer
    For applying the EasyShoe Performance.

For more information about glue-ons and gluing, watch our YouTube videos. And to find a Hoof Care Practitioner near you, check out our website Dealer Locator.