Modifications of Easyboot Glove and Glue-On Shells: Part II

Submitted by Pete Ramey

Glove Glue-On Shells    

The Industry’s Shift to Synthetic Horseshoes 
In my opinion, the increasing popularity of synthetic shoes – both for rehab and for high performance – is a very good step in the right direction. During the time that metal was the only material we had that would hold up under a horse, metal made a lot of sense as a horseshoe material. But these days we have a wide array of materials that will do the job, and most of them are much better for energy dissipation and shock absorption. These materials are also more flexible, which can allow the foot to function more normally, perhaps leading to increased health of internal structures when compared to more rigid shoes. 

I do worry that synthetic shoes will become just another thing that people leave on horses’ feet 365 days a year. Healthier than steel, perhaps, but still degrading the foot with their constant presence. I use these tools in my everyday work, but for most situations I remain a “barefoot and boot man,” as I think this combination yields the best hoof health in a majority of situations. 

My Love Affair with the Glove Shells
There are times, though, that long-term or even permanent hoof protection is needed. For these horses, I usually turn to the Glove Glue-On Shells, simply a Glove without the gaiter (instead of other synthetic shoe models) for several very specific reasons:

  • All of the glue bond is on the side wall, instead of on the bottom of the wall. This frees me up to unload areas of separated walls, making these shoes ideal for growing out hoof capsule rotation, toe flaring, and quarter flares (and thus wall cracks).
  • Almost as well as a hoof boot, if applied properly, they can allow total release of pressure to the sole during hoof flight. This allows you to get away with more sole pressure/support than any other fixed shoeing method I have seen, heard of, or tried.
  • There is no need to trim the foot “flat” in preparation for shoeing. The horse’s foot, when viewed from the side, is naturally arch-shaped, mirroring its internal structures. The only ways to level this arch for shoe prep are to, 1) thin the sole at the toe, 2) thin the sole at the heels, 3) leave the quarter walls too long, or some combination of those three. I can’t abide any of those, as each causes damage. Note: When floating the quarters above the shoe floor, be careful not to let glue run beneath the wall and harden under the sole.
  • The glue bond area is 3-5 times larger than typical glue-on shoes. There is also no need to prep or protect the prep of the ground surface of the foot. For beginners, this makes it easier to succeed with them. For seasoned veterans, this makes the bond as close to bombproof as a shoe can get.
  • I can pad in them! Most permanent shoe modifications accommodate padding or impression material under the arch of the sole, but not under the wall or the outer periphery of sole. This little trick is a true life-saver for thin-soled, splat-footed horses.
  • Using heat-fitting, this shoe can easily adapt to any almost any hoof shape, and be adapted to any breakover or heel support needs.
  • Economics. I can stock only this shell and, by trimming it down to shape, duplicate a wide array of products. If I want an Easyshoe, a Flip-Flop, a lower cuff, a direct glue shoe with no cuff, M/L or D/P wedge, better traction, heels in, heels out, open sole, closed sole, frog support… I can make one by removing unwanted material from this single product. This helps maximize precious storage space in my truck and, of course, dramatically cuts the expense of carrying extra stock. 

Heat-Fitting 
It is equally important to achieve a close fit with the Glue-Ons as it is with the Gloves. We have the same breakover and heel support needs. Large gaps between the wall and shoe will be difficult to fill with glue, and tight areas may push the shoe out of place before (or after) the glue dries. 

Better fit can be achieved with the Glue-Ons than the Gloves when large quarter flares are present since the gaiter is not in the way of quarter fitting. During the heating process, you will find that it is better to hold the shell with something besides your hand, particularly if you have opened the sole (discussed below). I use my shoe pull-offs or crease nail pullers.

As an end result, you want a snug but relaxed fit with little-to-no air space, and no pressure attempting to push the shoe out of place. Prior to gluing, you should be able to put it on the foot with no glue, walk the horse around on concrete, and it should stay in place.

Other Modifications

All of the modifications I discussed in Part I with the Glove boots can also be done to the Glue-On Shells. Below are additional options I use only when gluing.

Venting the Back of the Shoe
Gluing allows you to cut out the heel section of the boot completely. I almost always do this as it allows the foot to breathe, keeping the back half of the foot relatively free of the black, foul funk. I tend to do this simply with my pocket knife, and then I finish by rounding the top of the cuff with my nippers or shears. 


Opened heel of Glove shell, done with knife and nippers. I’m doing this to 90-something % of my glue-on shells.

Venting the Bottom of the Shoe
If there is adequate sole and frog in the center of the foot and if I don’t perceive a need to use impression material or padding, I often vent the bottom of the shoe. Using a jigsaw or Dremel, you can follow the contour of the shoe tread, mimicking the frog support and look of an EasyShoe. The material is strong and difficult to cut. Most tools actually burn their way through it, rather than cutting, and it can be a long process. 

So in most cases, I simply use a drill and hole saw (thank you Leslie Carrig!), usually 2 ¼” diameter, occasionally larger, to vent the bottom of the foot. This takes seconds to do, with no burning or clogging, though the end result may not look as cool as other designs, the horses never notice. As with almost any open-bottom shoe, there is some risk of a stone lodging between the shoe and the sole, causing problems. But the access to air can be worth the risk, particularly if the owner routinely picks and checks the area.

Pads and Impression Material
All of the padding methods discussed for the Glove boots will work with the Glue-On version, plus several additional options -- Dental Impression Material (DIM), pour-in pads, and Sikaflex 227 adhesive, to name a few. Generally, when using any type of pad, I leave the shoe’s stock sole intact (forgoing the sole vent). I also fill the collateral sulci and cover the sole with a thin layer of Artimud to keep infection at bay.

Prep and Glue
Gluing instruction is best done in person or at least via DVDs or YouTube (start here)  – not in writing – but here is my basic protocol in a nutshell, and in a very specific order:

  1. Trim the feet, clean out any infected areas in the white line or frogs, wire brush debris from the walls and bottom of the foot. This, and the other steps are each done to all four (or two) feet that are being glued in sequence, rather than doing each foot start-to-finish. This saves time.
  2. Heat-fit and do all shoe modifications. If using DIM or a felt pad, it is prepared at this point. If using a pour-in pad, decide if you need a hole or holes in the shoe to inject the pad.
  3. Sand all the gluing surface of the sidewall, yielding a rough finish. I cut 50 grit belt sander belts into small squares and do it by hand, or more recently, use a cordless drill buffer/sander. I then use the rough corner of my rasp to add fine grooves to the gluing surface. Take care to prep all the way to the back of the heels. This area can be hard to reach, easy to forget, and is the most critical area of glue bond. 
  4. With a small hand-held butane torch, I heat the outer wall for 1 or 2 seconds in each individual spot, moving the torch around very quickly while avoiding melting the hair at the coronet. Most of this, I do with the foot on the ground, but be sure to pick up the foot and prep the heels. I do the same to the inside of the shoe’s gluing area. This step eliminates dust, oils, and moisture, and is critical to success. After this step, take great care not to re-contaminate the glue surfaces of the hoof and shoe. Arm sweat, oils from impression materials and bacterial treatments are the most common culprits, as well as the grubby little hands of curious onlookers and well-meaning horse owners with a bottle of fly spray in hand (yep, it happened to me).
  5. Using a painter’s digital moisture meter, verify that all parts of the hoof’s gluing surface read 0.0% moisture. If not, repeat step #4. If a horse just came in from dry stall shavings or a dry pasture, one lap with the torch will usually do the trick. If the horse just came in from the rain, it may require three or more laps. Resist the temptation to heat longer as this could harm the horse. Instead, heat more times. Be patient – this is the most important step, particularly if you live in a damp climate.
  6. Glue. Keep it warm in winter, cool in summer. I like to use the guns and mixing tips – personal preference. Sometimes I use the acrylic, EasyShoe Bond Fast Set (Equilox, Equibond – all the same, with different labels) because it may be better glue for wet environments, and sometimes I use the urethane Vettec Adhere because it is less noxious and may do less damage to the walls. Adhere is also more user-friendly, and thus may be easier for beginners to succeed with.
  7. Purge the glue before installing the tip. For Adhere, be sure equal amounts of both agents are flowing freely. For EasyShoe Bond Fast Set, be sure the (white) bonding agent is flowing constantly, about 1/10th the volume of the pigmented agent. If so, wipe the glue from the end of the tube, being careful not to mix the agents, and apply the mixing tip.  
  8. If using DIM, place it on the foot. If using felt (or other) pads, place them in the shoes.
  9. Purge a grape-sized ball of glue onto the ground or paper towel, then apply the glue to the shoe. I avoid the sole, the ground surface of the wall, and the lower ½” of the cuff. The concern here is getting a glob of glue on the sole, which will then act as a stone in the shoe. To the rest of the cuff, I apply the glue liberally with a continuous ¼”-thick bead covering most of the gluing surface by the time I am done. In warm weather, I then put the shoe on immediately. In cold weather, I may stall for a bit, waiting for the glue to begin to cure. I repeatedly touch the glue with my gloved finger – at first the glue will attach a small “string” as I pull my finger away. As the glue starts to cure, this will not occur, and it is time to apply the shoe. As you do this, be careful not to drag glue from the sidewall onto the sole.
  10. Wait. For some applications, I want to cure the glue while I am holding up the foot (less sole pressure, less compression of pads – I generally do this on thin-soled horses). On other applications, I want to cure the glue with the foot on the ground (easier for lame or impatient horses; may yield a more snug “performance fit.”). If the shoe is to be cured in the air, put the shoe on, put the foot down on the ground, have an assistant pick up the off foot, then quickly put it back down (this spreads any glue that might have ended up on the sole). Pick up the foot you are gluing, check shoe placement, wipe off any excess glue, then hold the foot up until the glue dries. If the glue is to be cured with the foot on the ground, place the shoe, have your assistant pick up the off foot, and then watch the glued foot carefully as the glue dries. At some point partway through the cure, I switch places with the assistant, as I will want to be the one holding the foot during the latter (and more trying) minutes of the cure.
  11. Repeat for the other feet. You will need to clean, purge, and apply a new mixing tip for each shoe.
  12. Go around with a hoof pick and check the shoe heels to be sure they are bonded. If not, attach a new mixing tip and re-glue these areas. At this point, you can also seal the tops of the shoe cuff with a thin bead of glue. If you are slick, you can get all this done to all 4 feet with one mixing tip.
  13. If you are using pour-in pads, inject them now. Decide whether you want a lot of sole pressure, a little, or none. If you completely cure the pad while you are holding the foot off the ground, there will be a lot of support/pressure. If you put the foot down to let the pad cure, there will be none. It varies case-by-case, but I tend to do something in-between.
  14. When all the glues are cured, watch the horse move. Make final adjustments to breakover and heel rockers, if needed, based on movement.

Removal
After 5-6 weeks, Vettec Adhere will become brittle enough that shoe salvage is not terribly difficult (though it is still cheaper to buy a new shoe than it is to pay me to clean an old one up for you). I take a ¼” flathead screwdriver and work it between the shoe and the hoof, separating the bond.

With EasyShoe Glue (Equilox, Equibond…) at 5-6 weeks, the glue will not be brittle – the screwdriver method rarely works. Instead, using my hoof knife, I cut ½”-long slits in the top of the cuff, dividing the cuff into 6 sections around the circumference of the foot. I then use my shoe pull-offs to peel and rip each of the sections down and off the hoof wall individually. 

Tape-On Application
A hybrid between the on-off hoof boot and a glue-on application is the tape-on boot/shoe. Many people trail ride in this setup, and I use it for rehab cases when I need to cover the foot for 24-48 hours and then gain access. 

Warning: Results of this vary wildly. If a horse steps on his own shoe, they will pull right off. But I have also seen them stay on for a week and heard of them staying on even longer. I think it really depends on the way the horse moves and perhaps the environment. I have found that I can count on them for 48 hours as well as about anything – so this is how I use them. 

If a horse absolutely must have 24/7 protection, use a boot or a glue-on instead. I like to say, “Tape-ons are for when you kind-of need a shoe and only need it for a short period of time.” All that said, this is still a very commonly useful tool, and has the distinct advantage that you can keep re-using the same shell over and over, often for years to come. This can also be the only option (for turnout or riding) when the bulbs or coronet has been injured and permanent shoeing is not desired. This method also works for use similar to a hospital plate when daily access is needed to dress a wound or surgery site. 
This method is ideal for post-trim tenderness. A conscientious trimmer (with a stock of glue-on shells) who inadvertently causes post-trim soreness, can do a tape-on application to cover the foot for a few days, then pick up the boots at the next visit, clean them up and sell them to a gluing client. All it costs is the purchase of the tape and the time to clean up the boot.


Mueller Athletic Tape Application. Used alone with Glove Glue-On shells or as extra insurance with Glove hoof boots.

Mueller Athletic Tape
Note: Several years ago, I bought two cases of Mueller Athletic Tape, which I am still using. Apparently, it has since changed, and the material is now thinner (thanks, Amy Diehl), so these instructions may warrant some experimentation with the newer version of tape. I will update as I learn more. And, no, I will not sell you any of my tape. 
Here is my method:

  1. Heat-fit a Glove shell – and strive for perfection. Do not cut the back out of it or open the sole for this method – just use a stock shell. As always, the better the fit, the better this will work. You want to end up with no excessively tight spots and as little air space as possible. The shoe should be difficult to pull off, once applied. Be sure the boot is clean – free of dirt and moisture.
  2. No additional prep to the foot is required; just trim normally.
  3. Wrap the foot with Mueller Athletic Tape as if you were applying a hoof cast. I generally use 3-4 rounds/laps of tape, wrapping so that I cover all of the side wall that the boot shell will cover and also lapping under the wall and slightly onto the sole. 
  4. Drive the boot shell onto the foot with a rubber mallet (or for trail use, a big stick). For the first 30 minutes, the extra friction provided by the tape will make this shoe very difficult to remove. After 30 minutes, the heat and pressure will have caused the tape’s own glue to wick through the fabric and there will be a pretty decent glue bond. During the first 24 hours, it is almost as hard to get off as it would be if it were glued with hoof adhesive.
  5. The bond seems to disappear within 48 hours. I think dust simply works its way in and absorbs into the glue. I believe that when I (and others) have seen these stay on longer, it was simply because of good fit, the added friction, and a horse that never interferes or trips. Either way, removal after 36 hours is not an issue – you can generally pull them off by hand.

Mueller Athletic Tape in Gloves
The above wrapping method is even more useful as “Glove boot first aid.” If you are using Glove boots, carry a roll of Mueller Tape in your trail pack; it doubles as first aid tape, so shouldn’t take up extra precious space. If you rip a gaiter on the trail (or develop any other boot fit/performance issue) you can add the tape to the foot, knock the boot on with a stick, and ride on for the rest of the trip without a gaiter.

I even had one client who was using a #2 Glove when her friend threw a #0 horseshoe. They kept wrapping tape around the #0 foot until the #2 Glove fit and got the horse off the trail without further incident. My client discovered, at the same time, that her horse no longer needed boots for that particular trail anyway. Now, this is not a recommended application by any stretch of the imagination, but it did work.

Smoothing Boot Fit Problems
I like for my booting clients to have a roll on hand in case booting issues pop up mid-cycle. This is particularly common when I am in the process of growing out hoof capsule rotation or wall flares. The boot fit will get sloppy over time. I do try to adjust for this at routine visits, but sometimes I misjudge. Hopefully, when I arrive for my scheduled visit, I can de-bug the boot fit, but having a way to keep my clients riding saves me some unscheduled trips.

I recall two instances where I had to use the tape application with the Gloves as a permanent fix. I didn’t like it, but it was the best I could do. Both were on the hind feet of horses with hip problems that rotated their foot on the ground under load. After several boot-fitting fails, I left both clients applying one wrap of tape prior to booting the hind feet. Sloppy, yes, but better than nothing, I suppose. 

Race Day
This method, combined with adding Vet Wrap to the gaiter is how to make a bombproof Glove application. I don’t like to see clients train this way. I want to work through any booting bugs during normal rides. But on race day, show day, or that big group trail ride – that day when you want to be absolutely sure you don’t have any problems, it is worth the extra 3 minutes to put Mueller Tape on the foot, boot, then wrap the gaiter with Vet Wrap. Optionally, an added bell boot seals the deal.

And the List Goes On…
That’s the best thing about these two platforms (the Glove and Glove Shell). Your own imagination is the limit. While every boot and shoe can be modified to some extent, none other lends itself to so much possibility. In the past, I had to haul around a wide variety of options. Now, I find that I can get by with a full stock of only these two products – well – except that we do need them in larger sizes… and with some different tread options. 

For a complete article in PDF format, please follow this link to be redirected to Pete Ramey's website: http://www.hoofrehab.com/Glove%20Mods.pdf 

The EasyShoe FLEX In Action

Lately a lot of time and energy has been invested by the EasyCare staff  in the the improvement and testing of the new EasyShoe FLEX. In my February blog about the new FLEX, At Least Once, I had promised that more testing will follow and that I will report on the results here in the future. 

Some fellow farriers and riders asked me why we need yet another EasyCare product. After all, EasyCare is already offering so many boots and shoes: from the various strap-on boots for all equestrian disciplines and all levels of riders to Glue-on shells, half shells like the Flip Flop, four different EasyShoes for gluing and nailing. So, really, why even more EasyShoes?

Foremost, EasyCare is an innovator in hoof protection. That means that the staff of EasyCare, led by the CEO Garrett Ford, will always do R&D to make ever better products that will help the horses and make the job for Farriers and Hoof Practitioners easier. Read Garrett Ford's Blog from earlier this year explains all his R&D work recently. This specific new shoe is actually a joint venture with Curtis Burns and his company, Polyflex Horseshoes, No Anvil LLC. 

The FLEX offers distinct advantages compared to other EasyShoes:

- full urethane body with spring steel core

- promotes hoof mechanism

- the yielding steel core allows flex in heels, quarters and toe

- modifiable length of heel support

- available with open heel, frog support, dorsal and side clips

- can get easily modified and shortened with rasps or belt and wheel grinders

- high degree of shock absorption

- easy to nail on

- slots in steel core allow for precise nail placement on white line

The following photos explain these paragraphs above more graphically:

The nailing slots and dorsal clip of the steel insert.

Arrows point to the slots of the steel insert within the polyurethane body. The clear material allows the farrier to easily identify the white line.

With a grinder, the shoe can get modified in little time,  e.g. the dorsal clip removed, sides and heel area shortened and adjusted. 

Not a problem if some of the steel is getting removed as well.

Open heel model nailed on.

Model with heel support and dorsal clip.

A model with dorsal clip nailed on a horse named Starlit way of GETC. With this shoe he won a 50 mile endurance race and also won the BC Award.

Another example of a nailed FLEX.

Here is a short video on EasyCare's Facebook page explaining the application and modification possibilities: https://www.facebook.com/Easyboot/posts/10154780166780853

How did the FLEX perform in the field? What results did horses get that were shod with the new FLEX?

Nothing tests hoof care products of all kind more thoroughly than endurance rides and races over various terrain. Endurance is a relatively small segment of all the equestrian disciplines, yet it provides the best testing ground for shoes and boots. In 2017 alone, the FLEX was applied to several horses of Global Endurance Training Center and these horses were ridden by up to 4 riders in 23 separate endurance races. The results speak for themselves:

-14 Wins in 50 Mile races

- 9 Second Place finishes

- 15 Best Condition Awards

No horses shod with the FLEX were pulled for any kind of lameness. 

A win and BC Award for the FLEX at the recent Spanish Peaks Endurance Race, organized by SoCo Endurance and Tenney Lane in Colorado.

GETC's Starlit Way on his way to victory and BC award earlier this year at Antelope Island 50. (photo credit: Merri Melde)

GE Stars Aflame on her way to first place and BC at Mt Carmel this spring. (photo credit: Steve Bradley)

Now lets look at some of the shoes AFTER they had been used over various terrain:

This shoe was tested in 2 endurance races over decomposed granite and gravel roads. 100 race miles and 40 training miles, 4 weeks old.

150 endurance competition miles over varied terrain. The sole opening was optionally filled with Vettec CS to prevent any accidental sharp rocks to bruise the somewhat flat sole of this horse.

An open heel version, filled with Equipak for extra protection. If the soles are hard and well cupped, this step is not necessary for most applications.

The FLEX with steel insert is scheduled to be released sometime later this summer or fall. Later this year or early next year, these shoes will also get offered without the steel insert. The FLEX LIGHT is, as the name suggests, even lighter in weight. I also tested quite a few of these shoes as well and was able to compare to the ones with the steel insert. Results: The FLEX LIGHT wears as well as the FLEX and has as much stability. A great option for riders looking for very light weight hoof protection.

No steel insert. Next image below after 150 endurance miles over varied terrain:

Optionally filled the sole area with Vettec Equipak.

The LIGHT does not sport the steel insert, but the nails were just as secure and never loosened.  So, how do the nail holes look after 6 weeks and with one hundred and more miles of endurance races? In all cases, the nail holes were nice and square, no loosening or widening of the holes. Provided there is enough profile left, these shoes could get reset.

As mentioned above, the FLEX are easier to nail on compared to steel shoes and even the Performance N/G. For the future, EasyCare and Global Endurance Training Center are considering offering clinics for nailing these shoes to anybody interested in learning this skill. Stay tuned for updates on this topic.

Let us have a final look at the nail holes after the shoes were removed. The sample below was nailed on with 6 nails, the horse did 155 endurance competition miles and 60 training miles. These shoes were on the hooves for 5 weeks. There is a lot of profile left and they certainly could get reset. What impresses me most, though, are the clean and crisp square nail holes. Through all the wear and tear of the hundreds of thousands of foot falls, the nail holes did not enlarge at all. They are exactly the size and shape of the nail shaft. Impressive. It bears testimony to the toughness of the polyurethane material that EasyCare is using and to the quality of the product itself. 

 

From the desk of the Bootmeister

Christoph Schork

Global Endurance Training Center

Thinking Glue - Outside the Box of Equine Podiatry

Submitted by Chris Niclas CJF, CLS and owner of Chris’ Farrier Service Inc.

There have been many changes in the hoof-care industry over the last 25 years. One of the changes I have come to appreciate is the use of adhesives and glue-on shoes. From being intimidated by the failures of using glue in the beginning, to becoming comfortable using it in my daily practice, it has been a journey. As a teenager I became interested in hoof-care out of necessity. Almost 25 years later, I still have a passion for the horse and am driven to continue learning new skills as a farrier. 

I met Mark Plumlee, owner and instructor of Mission Farrier School, at an International hoof-care clinic he hosted in the late 1990’s. Mark is a Certified Journeyman Farrier, a Registered Journeyman Farrier, and a Certified Lameness Specialist. Knowing that Mark has been on the leading edge of farrier science, when it comes to farrier education, I approached him last fall and asked if I could attend Mission Farrier School. After 20 years as a professional farrier, I was excited to learn how much information is available in both the art and science of hoof-care. 

During my time at MFS, Mark asked me if I would be willing to partner with his school to go deeper into the emerging market of gluing on shoes in a way that was meaningful for the horse. Since I am currently working on my own certifications for becoming an Instructor and Examiner for the Equine Lameness Prevention Organization (ELPO), I realized this would be a good opportunity for me to thoroughly investigate the Glue-On protocol, as part of my “homework” for the ELPO certification. 

In teaching a glue clinic, I knew I needed to investigate and confirm what the general Glue-On protocol was currently. So last November, after attending a level 5 clinic with the ELPO in Loveland, CO, I drove down to Durango, CO and had the privilege of spending a day with Garrett Ford, CEO of EasyCare Inc. We spent most of the day gluing on shoes, as well as sharing our ideas, inventions, and prototypes. Becoming familiar with using glue and synthetic shoes has given me multiple options to protect and support the equine foot in both performance and therapeutic applications.

I knew I did not want to work with cadaver feet when teaching the glue clinic at Mission Farrier School. I also wanted an easy and simple way students could learn to work with the glue without the added stress of being under a horse. This led me to create a wooden foot that attached to a hoof stand and simulated the working positions needed to both glue on a shoe and remove it, since both are important when working with a glue-on equine clientele.

Garrett Ford and EasyCare Inc. were very generous in donating shoes and glue for the clinic. Additionally, Larkin Greene the Western Regional Sales Manager for Vettec, also donated glue and came up from California to attend the clinic. Larkin was instrumental in sharing his knowledge of chemistry and the structures of how the different adhesives work. His 35 years of experience gave us all many valuable tips in using glue successfully.

The Glue clinic was attended by farriers and students from across the United States. The state that were represented included Alaska, Washington, California, Colorado, Montana, North Carolina, Massachusetts and even the Netherlands. Everyone at the clinic had an opportunity to glue on 3 different shoes the EasyShoe Performance N/G, EasyBoot Glue-On and the EasyShoe Sport.

After each gluing exercise we would gather as a group and the class would share what they learned. This created a positive learning environment and allowed everyone to learn from others mistakes and successes. For most of the people attending the clinic, this was their first experience using glue. The learning curve often leaves a person discouraged or overwhelmed, which can lead to not using adhesives as a tool in their trade. My goal was to teach the steps of how to clean and dry the foot, so it is prepared for the process of gluing on a shoe and is the key to a successful gluing job. Providing a hands-on experience, students were able to learn firsthand what it looked like if they applied too much or too little glue. Being able to practice both gluing on a shoe and taking it off multiple times, created an environment where each participant could gain confidence in the process.

It is important to remember that each horse is an individual and each foot may have its own special needs. Throughout the two days there were brain puzzles on a dry erase board that challenged all attending to think outside the box. This became an exercise to stretch our minds in creativity and problem solving. For the third project everyone was able to create a problem and a solution for their wooden horse's foot. I really enjoyed watching how creative each team was at putting into practice “thinking outside the box”. Some teams made hoof wall extensions, others created a shoe with a hospital plate that could be glued on and others created ways of doing a hoof wall repair. At the end of the day I did a live demonstration putting all the pieces into practice on a special needs horse.

If you are curious and find yourself inspired to explore the world of adhesives and all the possibilities with gluing on a shoe, checkout the webinars that EasyCare has put together. They are well worth taking the time to watch and study.

Mission Farrier School has been teaching leading edge farrier science for 25 years, and offers a quality Farrier education. Most of their students come with little to no horseshoeing experience, but occasionally you’ll find a few seasoned professionals like myself learning the new science and advancing our own skills, right along-side the newbies.

The Equine Lameness Prevention Organization offers clinics and classes throughout the year teaching Hoof Mapping, proper Barefoot Trimming and advanced classes for becoming a Certified Lameness Specialist or Certified Farrier Glue Practitioner.

Vettec has countless clinics throughout the year and many helpful webinars and videos available on the internet. Take the time to check them out.

If anyone wants to practice on their own with a wooden horse hoof adapted to fit a hoof jack, mine will be available for sale by special order. I have found the horse is the best teacher of all. At the end of each day, it is the opinion of the horse that guides us to becoming the best hoof care providers we can be.

A big thank you to Mark & Karen Plumlee, Steve Foxworth, Garrett Ford, Larkin Greene, James Klund and my wife Kristi in helping and equipping me to help others.

 

Endurance 101 in Virginia

Submitted by Karen Neuenschwander, Team Easyboot 2016 Member

Entering an endurance ride for the first time can be an intimidating and overwhelming prospect. In an effort to help familiarize newbies to the sport, experienced endurance riders around the country have been putting on informational clinics known as Endurance 101. On February 28th, AERC Northeast Region Director, Mary Howell and a crew of volunteers offered one such clinic in New Kent, VA.

Mary sharing her wisdom and smiles!

During the morning session, Mary narrated a PowerPoint presentation covering the basic rules, equipment, and horse and rider skills, and strategies. Volunteers with endurance experience wore purple shirts and shared know-how and trail wisdom. It was a fun atmosphere with endurance related prizes given out as attendees were encouraged to join the discussion.

In the afternoon, participants gained some hands on skills when the "purple shirts" ran a mock vet check and crew station. Attendees took Mary's horses through the vet check, and practiced scribing, pulse taking, and crewing. There was also a tack display with a variety of saddles, pads, saddle packs, and bridles, with volunteers available to discuss the different options.

Volunteers and participants discussing vet check procedure.

Since hoof protection is an essential part of successful competition, available options were a hot topic. As one of the "purple shirts", I displayed and explained what items are commonly used. Many of the attendees were familiar with traditional horseshoes and some hoof boots, but several were surprised at the variety of products available. We discussed the importance of proper fit and finding a boot or shoe to match the horse and type of riding. EasyShoes and glue-on options drew a lot of interest. Those using traditional shoes took note of the different possibilities to replace a lost shoe on trail.

As with endurance riding in general, riders' confidence and motivation to try something new increased as they were able to see and discuss the different hoof protection choices. EasyCare provided product brochures for the event, and folks really enjoyed seeing things that may work for their horse.

EasyCare boot and shoe display allowed participants to get "hands on" with products.

The clinic received very positive feedback from attendees, many of whom plan to learn more when they participate in mounted camping clinics in upcoming weeks.

Farriers Crowd The EasyCare Booth at the 13th Annual International Hoof-Care Summit in Cincinnati, Ohio

Submitted by Deanna Stoppler, Team Easyboot 2015 Member

This week I attended the 13th Annual International Hoof-Care Summit in Cincinnati, Ohio.  More than 1,100 farriers attended the four-day event with more than 130 vendor booths set up in the Duke Convention Center.

EasyCare, Inc. and Polyflex Horseshoes booths were crowded with farriers and offered a unique opportunity for farriers who signed up in advance to compete in one of two horseshoe glue-on competitions. EasyCare offered the Flip Easyboot Flop Flop Glue-On Division and Polyflex Horseshoes offered the Polyflex Horseshoe Glue-On Division.

Prizes in each division were $500 for first place, $300 for second place, and $200 for third place. Competitors were scheduled by the hour and only had an hour to complete the application. All competitors finished in the allotted time.

Derick Vaughn, of Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital, Second Place Winner of the Flip Flop Glue-On Division.

Hoof preparation for both glue-on applications were very similar; in fact EasyCare’s Garrett Ford adopted many techniques developed by Curtis Burns, owner of Polyflex Horseshoes.

The Polyflex horseshoe was applied using the steps outlined below.

Hoof Preparation

  • Rasp solar surface of foot to clean any debris off foot after your trim.
  • Treat all bacterial areas with Thrush Off and seal with Polyflex Seal-It.
  • Use a drill and buffy attachment (60 grit buffy paper) to clean and rough up the outer hoof wall and heel area.
  • Use a wire brush to clean the outer wall.
  • Use a handheld torch to dry the hoof wall. Torch then brush. Repeat three times.
  • Use a wire wheel to remove dust and debris from the solar surface of the hoof.
  • Dremel the heels (removing all overgrown periople) and bar region.
  • Use a handheld torch to dry the sole then remove all dust with a wire brush.

Shoe Preparation

  • Shape your shoe using a stall jack or by hand. Do not use a hammer to shape the shoe.
  • Clean the sole side of the shoe with a Dremel (use 9931 bit), roughing up the glue surface of the shoe. Be sure to get the inside and outside of the heel area roughed as well.
  • Use Keratex putty mixed thoroughly with copper sulfate crystals to pack any bacterial areas in the hoof, preventing glue from entering the depressions.

Polyflex Horseshoe Application

  • Dispense 2 oz of Polyflex Bond in a plastic rimless cup and mix with a 1/4 tsp of copper sulfate crystals.
  • Mix glue and copper sulfate with a wooden tongue depressor (cut one end of the depressor at a 45’ angle to use later).
  • Once glue is completely mixed, apply evenly on the sole surface of the shoe.
  • Set the shoe on the foot and use the remaining glue from the cup to blend in the heels and quarters. 
  • Use the angled end of the depressor to remove glue from the sole surface of the foot.
  • Do not wrap the foot with plastic wrap.
  • Hold the foot until glue is completely cured.

Finish

  • Once the glue has completely cured, use the buffy to smooth the glue and create a nice transition from hoof wall, glue, to shoe.
  • Use the Dremel to clean up excess glue from around the heel and bar area of the shoe.

First Place Polyflex Division Pete Van Rossum prepping the sole side of the polyflex horseshoe

1st Place Polyflex Division Winner, Pete Van Rossum, prepping the Polyflex Horseshoe.

The Easyboot Flip Flop was applied using the following steps:

Hoof Preparation

  • Use a drill and buffy attachment to clean and rough up the outer hoof wall.
  • Use a wire brush to clean the outer wall.
  • Use a handheld torch to dry the outer hoof wall then brush with a wire brush.
  • Repeat three times.

Flip Flop Application

  • Load a cartridge of Vettec Adhere in the Vettec glue gun.
  • Make sure Flip Flop is clean and free of debris.
  • Cut the tip off the Vettec Adhere cartridge.
  • Purge a squirt of glue before attaching the Vettec tip and purging another squirt of glue.
  • Dispense glue on the cuff of the Flip Flop, filling only about 2/3 of the cuff from the top with glue so that glue does not get under the solar surface of the foot, creating sole pressure.
  • Apply the Flip Flop to the hoof making sure that the toe is completely set into the cuff.
  • Once the glue has set for about a minute, place the foot on the ground.
  • Use more glue to trace the outer cuff of the boot, creating a smooth seal between the hoof wall and boot cuff.

Finish

  • Once the glue has completely cured, use the buffy to smooth the glue and create a nice transition from hoof wall, glue, to cuff.
  • Be sure not to sand down the sides of the cuff where it ends and transitions to hoof wall.  Sanding this area too much could weaken the glue bond.

When the hoof preparation and shoe application methods are followed as listed above shoe failure will almost never occur.

Flip Flop Glue-On Division Completed Shoes

Curtis Burns and Garrett Ford judging all entries

The winners of this year’s glue competition are as follows:

Polyflex Horseshoe Glue-On Division

1st Place: $500 - Pete Van Rossum, Farrier and Owner of Pete Van Rossum Natural Hoofcare, Ramona, California.

2nd Place: $300 - Steve Norman, Farrier, Georgetown, Kentucky.

3rd Place: $200—Ashley Gasky, Farrier and Owner of Precision Hoof Care, Ballston Spa, New York.

Polyflex Horseshoe Owner, Curtis Burns, with Polyflex Horseshoe Division Winner, Pete Van Rossum

Flip Flop Glue On Division

1st Place: $500 - Jeremy Ortega, Farrier and Owner of From The Ground Up, Mokelumne Hill, California.

2nd Place: $300 - Deanna Stoppler, Farrier and Owner of Horse & Sole Hoof Care, Fairfax, Vermont; tied with Derick Vaughn, Farrier at Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky.

3rd Place: $200 - Daisy Bicking, Farrier and Owner of Daisy Haven Farm: School of Integrative Hoof Care, Parkesburg, Pennsylvania.

4th Place—Shawn Skorstad, Farrier Apprentice for Kendra Skorstad, Owner of Connected Healing Hoof Care, Rochester, Wisconsin.

Jeremy Ortega, First Place Winner of the EasyShoe Glue-On Division, with the EasyCare crew, Kevin Myers, Garrett Ford, and Debbie Schwiebert

Ashley Gasky, Jeremy Ortega, Deanna Stoppler, and Pete Van Rossum

Along with the competition, EasyCare displayed the new EasyCare Therapy Click System. Choose from a five degree or ten degree wedge pad that clicks into place on the bottom of the Easyboot Flip Flop and uses screws to lock the wedge into place. The Therapy Click System can also be used in conjunction with the Easyboot Cloud and eight other hoof boot models.

The cutest displays in the booth were the new Easyboot Mini Horse Boots. The boots have a simple construction and are easy to adjust. They can even be used as a therapy boot if your mini suffers from a hoof abscess or has an injury that requires the hoof to be wrapped and kept in a clean environment while healing. I already have clients lining up to purchase these boots for their minis. 

The booth was fun, interactive, and exciting. I can’t wait to see what EasyCare has in store for us at the 13th Annual International Hoof-Care Summit.

Tevis 2015: Meet Easyboot Elite Team Member Derick Vaughn

Derick started learning how to trim and nail on shoes from a local farrier near his home town in Humboldt County, California early in 2011. Always interested in horses, and a fan since childhood of day-long rides into the famous redwood forests of the area, Derick decided a career in the horse industry would suit him well. In September of 2011, he attended Red Rock Horseshoeing School and studied under Dave Abel. Derick wanted to expand his experience and learn more about alternative hoof care methods. He made contact with Megan Hensley, a barefoot trimmer based in the area. He tagged along with her for a day, and was so fascinated by the work and impressed by the results, that he decided to apprentice with her and colleague, Amy Thornbury. He eventually sold his anvil to start his own barefoot trimming business in Humboldt County. 

At work applying EasyShoes in Durango, Colorado.

He moved to Durango, Colorado, in September 2014, after two trips there to work with horses in the area. He appreciates the opportunities offered to him by living in close proximity to the the EasyCare research and development location because of the dynamic group of people he gets to meet and work with, including Curtis Burns and Dr. Ric Redden. In 2014, he applied Easyboot Glue-Ons to the Haggin Cup winning horse as well as Tevis Cup winning horse. In 2015, he glued EasyShoes onto a horse nominated for the famed Darley Award. Derick considers his area of expertise to be the application of glue-on composite shoes. His favorite classes at school were Ceramics and Wood Shop. When you watch him work, you might see some parallels in the balance and finishing techniques he uses. 

Riding the foothills at his favorite ranch in Humboldt County, California.

When asked to identify the three most influential people in his career path thus far, Derick credits Garrett Ford for teaching him to care about his work and to take special care around the details in the work often overlooked by others. He acknowledges Curtis Burns for an expression that Derick lives by: "Are you going to leave it like that?". Derick hears that question as he completes every trimming or gluing job he works on. He credits Megan Hensley for teaching him about hoof function, diet, mechanics, the difference between a farrier trim and a barefoot trim, and for helping him build a clientele in the sector that interests him the most. The biggest challenges Derick sees in his hoof care practice are staying true to the ten-year vision he has for his business, and managing to build a specialized practice in a small mountain town three hours from the closest highway. As well as developing his business in the Four Corners area, Derick regularly travels to Texas and Florida to work with clients from the Arabian horse racing world.

Looking ahead to the week spent with the Easyboot Elite team at the 2015 edition of Tevis, Derick is most excited about the honor of working with five of the best gluing hoof care practitioners in the country. He also hopes to be able to achieve his double cup gluing status for the second year in a row. 

A collage from Tevis 2014.

The Easyboot Elite team is a group of six gluing professionals from around the country who will spend the week before the 2015 edition of the Western States Endurance Ride gluing Easyboot Glue-Ons onto horses entered to compete in the ride. Together, they form the most accomplished and sophisticated team of gluing professionals in the world. To book your Tevis 2015 gluing appointment, please call any of our Customer Service Representatives at 1-800-447-8836, and be sure to read last week's blog about the appointment process.

Kevin Myers

easycare-marketing-director-kevin-myers

Director of Marketing

I am responsible for the marketing and branding of the EasyCare product line. I believe there is a great deal to be gained from the strategy of using booted protection for horses, no matter what the job you have for your equine partner.

6 Takeaways from the IHCS Glue Competition

EasyCare and No Anvil, LLC had a very interactive booth at the International Hoof Care Summit in Cincinnati this year. A big crowd is always expected to witness the latest and greatest hoof care products and demonstrations. For the first time, the 2015 IHCS EasyCare/No Anvil booth invited the crowd to jump in. Several practitioners were able to get a hands-on education and try out the gluing protocol for themselves. The top three black smith buddy hooves with the most meticulous application and smoothest appearance were awarded with cash prizes for both the PolyFlex model and EasyShoe model competitors.


Although several of the black smith buddy hoof entries were sent home with the participants, a few made it back to EasyCare's Research and Development office in Durango, Colorado. Garrett Ford, inventor of the EasyShoe, sat down with me and compared the hoof submissions to one another. His conclusions are demonstrated below.

 

1. Breakover

The heels are lined up evenly on this hoof. The shoe on the bottom has been rasped for a more aggressive breakover, whereas the top shoe is barely touched with a rasp.

 

 

2. Copper Sulfate Amount

The hoof on the left shows glue that is diluted by too many CS crystals. Only 1/4 teaspoon is needed per 2 ounces of glue.

 

 

3. Glue Height

The hoof on the right shows glue applied over an inch above the cuff of the shoe, while the shoe on the left only a 1/4 of an inch. The drawback in having glue to high on the hoof wall is that the glue smothers the hoof in areas where the hoof should be allowed to breathe.

 

 

4. Attention to Heels

It's important for the heel application of the shoe to be seamless from hoof to glue to shoe. The shoe below is a great demonstration of how the heel should appear after application.

 

 

 

5. Set-up Time

You'll find parts of the finished product appearing like this if the glue sets before it's on the hoof.

 

 

6.Super Glue

It not only provides a pretty, shiny finish, it seals the deal of the bond between shoe, glue and hoof. You can purchase the Super Glue product of recommendation by visiting the Polyflex Horseshoes site here.

 

 

Check out a side-by-side shot of Garrett's Blacksmith Buddy hoof from the 2014 International Hoof Care Summit and his beauty from this year.

 

 

Leaves the mind wondering what exciting things the year ahead may gift the horse community with. Please contact us with any questions you may have regarding the EasyShoe, it's application, and how to customize it for your horse's particular needs.

Mariah Reeves

easycare-customer service-mariah

Customer Service

As one of the customer service representatives, I am happy to help get your horse into the right boots. I promote holistic methods of equine care and will assist you with finding the perfect fit for horse and rider.

If You Don't Change the Process, You Won't Change The Result

Submitted by Ashley Gasky, 2014 Team Easyboot Member

Thanks to the American Association of Professional Farriers Mentor-Mentee program I’ve been able to work with seventh generation farrier Timothy Cable, APF.  

Tim began his farrier career at 13 years old, apprenticing for his father, just as the previous generations of Cable shoers had. He has a large client base of Standardbred race horses, as well as dressage horses and Show Jumpers all over the United States and Canada.

 

Tim and Hall of Fame Blacksmith Red Renchin

The Cable family is responsible for awe inspiring pieces of blacksmithing, and the horses they’ve shod have found success in any discipline you can think. Succinctly, they are a very skilled group of professionals.

Chrome Horse Shoes crafted by Phillip Cable

My business, Precision Hoof Care focuses primarily on non-metal horse shoes, effective glue techniques, and healthy bare hooves. I've been successful at what I do, selected as an EasyBoot Elite team member for Tevis 2015, but I am always looking to learn new things.

 In developing a Mentor-Mentee relationship with Tim, I sought to learn about ‘how the other half lives’, that is to say, farrier fundamentals and blacksmithing. I’ve had the opportunity to visit world class Equine facilities in Connecticut and Florida as part of the arrangement, meet world class professional horsemen and hall of fame farriers. I have a video gallery of forging techniques I’m years away from attempting, and several notebooks filled with hints and wisdom to show for the experience. Throughout this, I’ve even done a bit of teaching myself. I had the opportunity to introduce him to Easyboots and EasyShoes.

You see, Tim is something of an innovator, and has been using non-traditional tools and techniques in his every day shoeing for a long time. For example he designed an attachment for his shoeing caddy to simplify the process of gluing on horseshoes.

It’s been very exciting for me to watch someone so steeped in tradition, with blacksmithing engrained from a young age, nail on a pair of Performance N/G's, measure a hoof for accurate fit of an Easyboot Glove, or shape glue on EasyShoe Competes at his anvil.

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Traditional steel and aluminum horse shoes certainly have a place, and so do the professionals who use them exclusively. However, seeing how readily Tim and his clients accepted the change in shoeing material gives me hope for an open minded future. I am just as excited to learn how to move metal as I am to watch alternative hoof wear go mainstream. The market for these products is growing and the horses using them are succeeding.

It is not always a pleasant journey when you are swimming against the current. Perhaps some of you can relate. Therefore it is important to celebrate victories and accomplishments no matter how small. I helped a talented farrier find tools to help certain horses in his care. These small steps are what I believe to be the seeds of change, germinating towards a bright future for horses and healthy hooves. For me, that is what it is all about!

Glue a Shoe and Win All the Money

Will you be attending the International Hoof Care Summit in Cincinnati, Ohio, on February 4 & 5, 2015? If so, you should stop by at the EasyCare/No Anvil booth #723/725 and enter the 2015 EasyShoe/No Anvil Gluing Contest presented by Blacksmith Buddy.

With $2,000 in cash prizes across two gluing divisions, this is your chance to pay your way to the IHCS. Come get your glue on with us. Choose to apply a Polyflex Horseshoe or one of the four EasyShoe models to a Blacksmith Buddy foot. We will have with us all the materials you need to make the best gluing application of the whole competition. Enter either the Polyflex or EasyShoe division by signing up at: easycareinc.wufoo.com/forms/easycarepolyflex-gluing-contest-registration/.

ESP.jpgpolyflex turf shoe.png

Contest Details.

  • All tools and supplies will be provided to the contestants at no cost.
  • EasyShoe Bond Fast Set will be used for gluing.

Judging will be based on the following: Cash prizes: $500 for 1st place, $300 for 2nd place, and $200 for 3rd place in each division.

  • Hoof prep technique.
  • Quality of shoe fit to the Blacksmith Buddy foot.
  • Overall gluing application skills, including volume of glue used, neatness of application.
  • Quality of final finishing.
  • How closely did the contestant follow the recommended gluing protocol?

Contest numbers are limited and gluing appointments will be assigned based on a first come, first served basis, so do not delay. Sign up at easycareinc.wufoo.com/forms/easycarepolyflex-gluing-contest-registration/.

We look forward to seeing you in Cincinnati!

Kevin Myers

easycare-marketing-director-kevin-myers

Director of Marketing

I am responsible for the marketing and branding of the EasyCare product line. I believe there is a great deal to be gained from the strategy of using booted protection for horses, no matter what the job you have for your equine partner.

EasyCare Announces the 2015 Easyboot Elite Tevis Gluing Team

We announced today the selections for the 2015 Easyboot Elite Tevis Gluing Team. Six individuals were chosen from more than 100 applicants from across the world. Together, they will take on the challenge of applying Easyboot Glue-Ons to more than 50 horses entered in the 2015 Western States Trail Ride, aka the Tevis Cup.

We consider the booted Tevis horses in 2015 very fortunate to be under the hoof care and supervision of six such accomplished individuals for the most challenging 100-mile endurance event in the world.

The 2015 Easyboot Elite Tevis Gluing Team members are:

Curtis Burns, Wellington, FL
Ashley Gasky, Ballston Lake, NY
Jeremy Ortega, Mokelumne Hill, CA
Deanna Stoppler, Fairfax, VT
Peter Van Rossum, Ramona, CA
Derick Vaughn, Durango, CO

Each of the team members was selected based on their prior experience in hoof care, expertise in the application of composite shoes and hoof boots, as well as an ongoing demonstrated commitment to continuing education and evolution of their hoof care practice. 

MCM Last Dance in Easyboot Glue-Ons with Barrak Blakely with and his family at the presentation of the 2014 Haggin Cup award. 

It is an impressive group of hoof care professionals who boast significant achievements between them. Whether it be applying Polyflex horseshoes onto the winning horse of the Breeders’ Cup Classic, gluing hoof boots onto the Tevis Cup and Haggin Cup winning horses, applying EasyShoes onto the highest performing dressage horses in the country, or dedicating their time to working in partnership with the finest farriers in the country, this team truly represents the elite in today’s hoof care industry. How fitting that they will be applying hoof boots to horses who will cover the most grueling 100-mile horse event known to man and woman.

Easyboot is no newcomer to the annual Western States Trail Ride. In 2014, ten of the horses in the top 15 horses were wearing Easyboots. The first place horse in 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 was wearing Easyboot Glue-Ons. The Best Conditioned horses (Haggin Cup) in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2014 were wearing Easyboot Glue-Ons.

The Easyboot Elite team will work in pairs for three days during the week of the event. Based out of the Gold Country Fairgrounds in Auburn, California, the three teams of two professionals will care for more than 50 competing horses in preparation for race day on Saturday, August 1, 2015. It will be the 60th anniversary of the event, and the sixth consecutive year that Easyboot Glue-Ons have been used to traverse the Tevis trail. 

Kevin Myers

easycare-marketing-director-kevin-myers

Director of Marketing

I am responsible for the marketing and branding of the EasyCare product line. I believe there is a great deal to be gained from the strategy of using booted protection for horses, no matter what the job you have for your equine partner.